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BILL WOLFF (Announcer): This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Thanks, Rico. Good morning, everyone.

The recent violence in Kenya is a clear-cut case of ethnic cleansing. That's according to the U.S. envoy to Kenya. Jendayi Frazer said the killings in Kenya's Rift Valley were aimed at chasing out President Mwai Kibaki's Kikuyu people. She spoke to reporters from Ethiopia, where she is attending the African Union Summit.

Yesterday, gunmen killed a key opposition lawmaker, and slums nearby exploded with violence as gangs set fire to homes and businesses owned by Kikuyus. People openly grieve the death of the lawmaker.

(Soundbite of people grieving)

MARTIN: That clip courtesy of The New York Times.

The international community is pressuring Kibaki and his chief rival Raila Odinga to share power and end the crisis. Former U.N. head Kofi Annan is there mediating. But he had said that settling on a power-sharing deal could take as long as a year. More than 800 people have been killed since the December 27th election. International Observer said that poll, which gave President Kibaki another term, was flawed.

And can an apology help ease generations of ethnic tensions in Australia? The government there sure hopes so. Yesterday, Australia announced that the government will issue an apology to the so-called stolen generations of Aborigines, the indigenous people of Australia. The issue has divided Australians for the past decade. And the new prime minister, Kevin Rudd, made it one of his campaign promises last fall. But the apologies fall short of the compensation that some aboriginal leaders had been pushing for.

From 1910 until the 1970s, around 100,000 aboriginal children were taken from their parents under the state and federal laws that said Aborigines were a doomed race and saving their children with a humane alternative.

And over to a recap of the big political story today, Arizona Senator John McCain won the coveted Florida GOP primary. Top rival Mitt Romney came in second place, and Rudolph Giuliani at distant third. Giuliani had put Florida at the center of his campaign strategy and had banked on a win there, so after a disappointing third-place finish, the former New York mayor is expected to step out of the race. And reports say he's likely to throw his support behind John McCain.

All eyes now move west to California, the site of the final big debate before Super Tuesday. The GOP candidates square off tonight, the Democrats on Thursday.

And if you're a president looking down the pike at your last year in office, frankly, you don't have a lot to lose so why not talk openly about your formal - a former alcohol addiction. President Bush did just that yesterday during a visit to a faith-based program in Maryland that helps former prisoners kick drug and alcohol problems. Bush met personally with two men who graduated from the program. He told the men, quote, "I understand addiction and I understand how a changed heart can help you deal with addiction," end quote.

Bush decided to quite drinking the day after a particularly boozy 48th birthday celebration in 1986. And while he's admitted to drinking too much in the past, he's never used the word addiction before. The visit came the day after Bush's last State of the Union speech where he addressed the importance of faith-based programs.

That is the news. It is always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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