In Beirut, a Beauty Salon that Feels Like Home The Cannes Film Festival is known for its highbrow fare, but every once in a while a crowd-pleaser sneaks into the mix. Caramel, a new film from Lebanon, was one such delight at the last festival.
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In Beirut, a Beauty Salon that Feels Like Home

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In Beirut, a Beauty Salon that Feels Like Home

Review

Arts & Life

In Beirut, a Beauty Salon that Feels Like Home

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The film choices that pleased the crowds of the Cannes Film Festival include "Caramel," a new film from Lebanon. And we have a review this morning from Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION critic Kenneth Turan.

KENNETH TURAN: "Caramel" investigates the complications and contradictions of the romantic lives of five women who either work or hang out at a neighborhood beauty salon.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "CARAMEL")

TURAN: Using largely nonprofessional actors, "Caramel" casually submerges us in a world like our own, yet removed from it. The language may be different, but the joy these women feel when one of their own gets married is universal.

(SOUNDBITE OF WOMEN CHANTING)

TURAN: "Caramel" has the tact and sophistication not to tie things up too tidily for any of its women. All these characters can count on, finally, is that they will be there for each other. The bonds between women, "Caramel" says, are the ones that last.

INSKEEP: Kenneth Turan reviews movies for MORNING EDITION and the Los Angeles Times.

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