Margaret Truman Daniel, President's Daughter, Dies Margaret Truman Daniel, the only child of President Harry Truman, died this week at age 83. Daniel was a professional singer for a few years and later became an author. She wrote well-received biographies of her father and mother, then turned to murder mysteries.
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Margaret Truman Daniel, President's Daughter, Dies

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Margaret Truman Daniel, President's Daughter, Dies

Margaret Truman Daniel, President's Daughter, Dies

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: Margaret Truman Daniel died on Wednesday. She was 83. No cause of death was given. Mrs. Daniel was the only child of President Harry Truman. She was a college student when Franklin Roosevelt died and her father became president. And for a few years she was a professional singer.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: Later she became an author. She wrote well-received biographies of her father and her mother before she turned to murder mysteries. Starting in 1980 with "Murder in the White House," she produced a new mystery almost ever year, strewing corpses from the Supreme Court to Congress to the Kennedy Center. Her last book, "Murder on K Street," was published last year.

Margaret Truman always said that she had hated living in the White House. She called it the great white jail. But her musical career seemed to bloom while she resided there. She gave a performance at Constitution Hall in 1950 that became most famous for the review it received, and the review President Harry Truman gave the reviewer. Washington Post music critic Paul Hume panned the performance, saying Margaret Truman had a, quote, "pleasant voice of little size and fair quality, and was flat a good deal of the time."

President Truman wrote the critic: Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens, you'll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below.

The two men later met and became friends.

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