Video Game Company Makes Bid for Rival Video games raked in more than $8.5 billion in U.S. sales last year. The company Electronic Arts wants to remain the leader of the fast-growing industry, so it's trying to buy a big rival, Take-Two — the company behind the popular game Grand Theft Auto.
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Video Game Company Makes Bid for Rival

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Video Game Company Makes Bid for Rival

Video Game Company Makes Bid for Rival

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's business news starts with video game giants racing to consolidate.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Some of them are, anyway. Video games raked in more than eight and a half billion dollars in U.S. sales last year. And the company Electronic Arts wants to stay leader of the fast-growing industry, so it is trying to buy a big rival - Take Two. That's the company behind the popular game "Grand Theft Auto." Electronic Arts is offering $2 billion. But on Friday, Take Two said forget about it. Electronic Arts is now launching a hostile bid. It's going straight to Take Two shareholders, hoping they'll overrule the board - maybe make a video game out of takeovers.

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