Uncertainty Stalls Recruiting Efforts For Deportation Relief : Code Switch The Obama administration began granting deportation relief with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2012. But half of the eligible unauthorized immigrants still haven't applied.
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Uncertainty Stalls Recruiting Efforts For Deportation Relief

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Uncertainty Stalls Recruiting Efforts For Deportation Relief

Uncertainty Stalls Recruiting Efforts For Deportation Relief

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now we're going to hear about an immigration program that's not being used as widely as you might expect. The program is called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA. It allows young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to avoid deportation and get a work permit for two years. But a new study out today shows almost half of those eligible are not applying. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports on the program as it approaches its second anniversary.

HANSI LO WANG, BYLINE: Almost 600,000 unauthorized immigrants have been accepted into the DACA program since 2012, including 23-year-old Claudia Flores.

CLAUDIA FLORES: People ask you, you're not here legally or you don't have a legal status yet you have a Social Security number?

WANG: Flores also has a work permit now and peace of mind knowing that she can, at least temporarily, avoid deportation. She was 14 when she flew to the U.S. from Honduras with her family whose visas all expired. Now working in Washington, D.C. as an immigrant rights advocate, Flores says with DACA, she can be more open about who she is.

FLORES: You know, you exist because you have a piece of paper that identifies you. And that's something that maybe, you know, if you were born in this country you might, you know, not appreciate the same way.

WANG: There are more than a million young unauthorized immigrants who, like Flores, are eligible for DACA. That's according to a new report by the non-partisan Migration Policy Institute. But about half of them have not applied says the think tank's president Michael Fix.

MICHAEL FIX: I think you can look at it as a glass half-full or a glass less than half-full.

WANG: Fix says the hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients so far are mainly female and from Mexico, Central America and Peru. DACA only lasts for two years and recipients have to reapply. Despite extensive efforts by the government and nonprofits to reach all eligible immigrants, Fix says many simply are not signing up.

FIX: You wouldn't apply for it if you didn't know about it. You wouldn't apply for it if you couldn't afford the fees.

WANG: It costs $465 to apply each time - fees that were too high for 17-year-old Jocelyn Lopez who's been eligible for two years.

JOCELYN LOPEZ: I am a twin, and it's two of us. And financially, my parents didn't have the money to pay for both of our DACA's.

WANG: Jocelyn was 3 years old when she crossed the U.S.-Mexican border illegally with her family. They now live outside Los Angeles where Jocelyn's father works in construction. Her mother was laid off from her factory job earlier this year. So, Jocelyn says, it wasn't until the Mexican Consulate offered to pay for their application fees that she and her twin sister could afford to apply for DACA in June.

LOPEZ: I'm actually pretty excited because I can start working and paying for my own stuff. It's another step for me becoming more independent and not relying on my parents that much.

WANG: Relying on DACA for deportation relief was always meant to be temporary says Audrey Singer, an immigration policy expert at the Brookings Institution.

AUDREY SINGER: There was much more hope when DACA was announced that immigration reform was going to happen.

WANG: That hope has waned as Congress remains deadlocked over immigration and midterm elections draw nearer. Singer says it raises the question among potential DACA applicants.

SINGER: If I apply and the program goes away, what happens? Will I be deported? Will I put my family at risk?

MONTY: Our name's in the records so anything can happen. We can be sent back to our countries. It is a risk.

WANG: Monty who is 31 and works in IT asked us not to use his last name because he fears deportation if the DACA program ends. Born in Indonesia, he flew to the U.S. from Jakarta at age 6 with his mother and siblings whose visas all expired. With DACA, Monty can stay in America while President Obama keeps his executive directive in place. And that's a risk, Monty says, that's worth taking. Hansi Lo Wang, NPR News.

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