When Do Food Shortages Become A Famine? There's A Formula For That : Parallels The U.S. government has a detailed and technical system for determining a famine. But conditions in South Sudan make it extremely difficult to assess just how dire the situation is.
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When Do Food Shortages Become A Famine? There's A Formula For That

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When Do Food Shortages Become A Famine? There's A Formula For That

When Do Food Shortages Become A Famine? There's A Formula For That

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A U.N. helicopter apparently was shot down yesterday while on a routine cargo flight over South Sudan. It illustrates the difficulty of bringing food aid to the war-torn country and the challenge of figuring out how serious that food crisis is. There's a U.S. agency that's supposed to make that determination - the Famine Early Warning Systems Network, or FEWS NET. But as NPR's Gregory Warner reports, it may take the arrival of famine - that powerful F-word - to open up the world's coffers.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Chris Hillbruner has a little-known job with an extraordinary responsibility - to tell us how close any given country has come to famine. In his six years at the U.S. agency FEWS NET, he's only officially declared famine once before in Somalia in 2011.

CHRIS HILLBRUNER: The bar for declaring a famine was deliberately set a little bit higher.

WARNER: Because, he says, what governments want to avoid is the confusion that used to happen in the '80s and '90s when some well-meaning aid agencies would act like the boy who cried famine.

HILLBRUNER: Famine is a word that gets thrown around a lot.

WARNER: And the word, itself, is potent. Consider Somalia - a pretty neglected country most of the time, but when FEWS NET declared famine in 2011, aid money swarmed in. So did TV cameras. And that's when this suddenly-famous food crisis was defeated. A lesser-known fact is that by the time the word famine was declared, at least half of its 260,000 victims had already died. In other words, by the time a situation gets as bad as famine, you've already arrived too late.

HOLLY SOLBERG: Sadly it does often take using that F-word before people actually realize there is a crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF BABY CRYING)

WARNER: Holly Solberg is the emergency response director for CARE International. She wants to make sure that South Sudan doesn't look like another Somalia - rescued only at the last minute. Earlier this summer, I found myself in a malnutrition clinic run by the International Rescue Committee in the remote South Sudan region of Ganyliel. No cars can get here during rainy season. In fact, food aid has to arrive by plane. I was rode here on a palm-bark canoe. Under a tree, I met a woman named Nya Buol. She was suckling twins.

NYA BUOL: (Foreign language spoken).

WARNER: She admits that there is no milk for these toddlers. Her breasts are dry. IRC estimated in June that over 30 percent of children here were acutely malnourished. That situation's improved since the agency arrived. But the United Nations says that it's only raised half of the $1.8 billion it says it needs this year to keep supplying clinics like this one. Holly Solberg worries that, just as in Somalia, the world is waiting for those images of starving kids to hit their TV screens.

SOLBERG: We don't need to wait until that happens. And so let's get the media there sooner. Because the truth of the matter is, if we respond earlier, prevention is less expensive than treatment.

WARNER: International media, of course, can be blamed for lots of things. But even if this crisis did get more coverage, it would still have to compete with other major catastrophes, like Ebola and the Syrian refugee crisis, for the world's generosity. And in South Sudan, there's a harvest coming in now, so the real risk of famine is likely some months in the future - probably closer to February. The more media difficulty in South Sudan is this - that none of the food crisis assessments so far have included all the people hardest hit by hunger. And that's because, says Chris Hillbruner of FEWS NET, his assessment teams can't reach them because of heavy rains and violent conflict.

HILLBRUNER: It's very possible that there could be pockets that are worse off then we're currently able to classify.

WARNER: And this, he says, is the problem at the very heart of the whole famine early warning system - a system that he, himself, is the lead analyst for. The very conditions, he says, that might bring the first waves of famine to South Sudan - war and rains and tribal distrust - are precisely what make it impossible for experts to collect the data that might deliver the country that attention-getting famine credential. Gregory Warner, NPR News.

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