Losing A Friend On Sept. 11 'Will Travel In Me My Entire Life' Sekou Siby was supposed to be working at the World Trade Center when planes hit the twin towers. But three days before, he had swapped shifts with his friend, Moises Rivas.
NPR logo

Losing A Friend On Sept. 11 'Will Travel In Me My Entire Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/345868194/345997482" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Losing A Friend On Sept. 11 'Will Travel In Me My Entire Life'

Losing A Friend On Sept. 11 'Will Travel In Me My Entire Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/345868194/345997482" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Time now for StoryCorps. Next week marks the 13th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. And StoryCorps has been partnering with the National September 11th Memorial and Museum to record a remembrance of each life lost that day. Today, we'll hear from Sekou Siby, an immigrant from Ivory Coast. He worked in the kitchen at Windows on the World, a restaurant at the top of the North Tower of the World Trade Center. He remembers the 72 colleagues from the restaurant he lost that day, many of them also immigrants. Sekou was supposed to be working the morning of September 11th, but he had switched shifts with another kitchen worker named Moises Rivas.

SEKOU SIBY: I was a prep cook, so for eight hours peeling potatoes and cleaning onions. And when Moises Rivas was hired, I was assigned to train him. We had a strong relationship because I was directing his work. On September 8th, Moises Rivas asked me do you mind working for me on Sunday and I'll pick up your shift on Tuesday? So he ended up working September 11th and he did not make it. He has two kids. You know, losing one person in your life is dramatic, but I lost a lot of people. And what I compared it to is the experience of a soldier without being a soldier because a soldier is trained to lose massive amount of people and we were just kitchen workers. So after 9-11, I did cab driving for almost a year and a half, you know, take this person point A and I drop you point B. Let's not make friends because I felt like if I had to lose another close friend of mine, I don't think I would be able to recoup from it. The feeling of why Moises, why not me, is something that will trouble me in my entire life. He went to work and never made it home.

(SOMBER PIANO MUSIC)

GONYEA: That's Sekou Siby, remembering his co-worker Moises Rivas, who died on September 11, 2001. This interview will be archived at the Library of Congress. You can hear more remembrances of those lost on 9-11 this week on the StoryCorps podcast. Get it on iTunes and npr.org.

Copyright © 2014 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.