Panel Round One Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: A Puzzling Motion Picture; The Feminine Side of Straight Talk.
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Panel Round One

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Panel Round One

Panel Round One

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Illinois. For tickets or more information, just surf on over to wbez.org or you can find a link at our website, which is waitwait.npr.org. Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Charlie, "Super Mario Brothers" was made into a movie, "Mortal Kombat" was made into a movie, and who can forget Alfred Hitchcock's The Angry Birds?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Now, another videogame is going to get the big blockbuster feature film treatment. What is it?

CHARLIE PIERCE: Missile Command."

SAGAL: I wish. It's like a hero make four lines in a row?

PIERCE: Oh, Tetris.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Tetris. Yes.

PIERCE: Tetris the movie?

SAGAL: Tetris the movie. Tetris the movie starring George Clooney as the long, manly, straight one.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The producers were able to get the rights to make a movie of the game Tetris because throughout the negotiation, the makers of Tetris that they were kidding.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It was like aliens come and, like, their ships are these big L shape and a big T shape. And you have the hero - Liam Neeson I assume - has to prevent...

(LAUGHTER)

PAULA POUNDSTONE: You got to get somebody who really knows shapes in there. I think the hero would have to be like Big Bird.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah. That's a square. I've seen that before. Faith, this week, Viagra released a groundbreaking new commercial. It was the first Viagra has ever put out that starts what?

FAITH SALIE: A woman.

SAGAL: Yes. Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It's woman. Now up til now, Viagra and other ED drugs and their commercials have focused on men, handsome middle-aged guys doing chores or taking baths with their wives in separate tubs outside or throwing footballs through tires or staring at their own crotches and shouting come on, you can do it little body.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But this new ad for Viagra features a woman. And of course, in the ad, she picks up a tire and throws it over a football.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: As you would expect. Actually, what it is, it's just this beautiful sort of tropical resort setting. And this woman is lying on the bed - very beautiful woman of course lying on a bed, talking to the camera directly going on about erectile dysfunction - ED. It's pretty straightforward, but it's weird when she says if you've got an erection lasting more than four hours, call me.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The problem is men - I know - are dumb. They see a gorgeous woman on TV talking about beer, they want a beer, standing next to a car, they want a car, talking about erectile dysfunction, now they all want erectile dysfunction.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: So this is big news for Viagra at the same time that the news comes out that it can also cause blindness. That was news this week.

SAGAL: It's like, oh, I buy Viagra except I can't see the woman who's telling me to buy it.

PIERCE: It's like your parents told you, if you keep buying Viagra, you'll go blind.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: That's why the new ad is a beautiful woman laying on a bed going I'm over here.

(LAUGHTER)

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