Cinema Snacks If you think the best part of going to the movies is the popcorn and candy, this game is for you! All the answers are mash-ups of movie titles and names of foods, like "Children of the Corned Beef."
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Cinema Snacks

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Cinema Snacks

Cinema Snacks

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Say hello to our next contestants, Greg Erlandson and Elizabeth Lauterhahn.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, you manage a massage clinic. Do you get a lot of free massages?

ELIZABETH LAUTERHAHN: I do.

EISENBERG: You do? Yeah, yeah...

LAUTERHAHN: A lot.

EISENBERG: ...You're like, it's amazing. Yeah, OK, it is amazing. So when you need a massage, you just go...

LAUTERHAHN: It's right there.

EISENBERG: ...To your job.

LAUTERHAHN: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Amazing. Crag is a cartographer.

CRAIG ERLANDSON: I am.

EISENBERG: Yeah, mapmaker. When you get lost, what do you do?

ERLANDSON: Oh, I look at my phone...

(LAUGHTER)

ERLANDSON: ...Like everyone else.

EISENBERG: No, you don't pull out...

ERLANDSON: I have no idea. No, I have no idea where I'm going.

EISENBERG: OK. So when you guys are at the movies, what is your favorite snack to eat? Craig?

ERLANDSON: I could make something up. But honestly, I'm just way too cheap to buy anything...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

ERLANDSON: ...From the movie snack bar. It's way too much.

EISENBERG: Right, OK.

ERLANDSON: Sorry.

EISENBERG: There's a lot of public radio people that agree with you.

ERLANDSON: Thank you. Thanks.

EISENBERG: Do you ever sneak anything in?

ERLANDSON: If I were to sneak something in it would be Milk Duds, absolutely.

EISENBERG: Oh OK, good to know. Elizabeth, how about you?

LAUTERHAHN: Well, I suggest you address in a purse because those make it easy to sneak things in. It's more of a process. I like to bite the ends off Twizzlers and use them as a straw.

AUDIENCE: Yes.

ERLANDSON: One guy, yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: I think your soul mate is in the audience.

EISENBERG: Right? I don't know what your relationship status is, but get single because...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So this round is called "Cinema Snacks." And lucky you, it's a mash up game. So that is a game where you combine things. In this case, you're going to combine the titles of movies with the names of foods. Let's go to our puzzle guru John Chaneski for an example.

JOHN CHANESKI: For instance, if I said it's a 1984 film based on Stephen King's tale of murderous teenagers in the fields, but Irish and with cabbage, you would say Children Of The Corned Beef.

COULTON: And then traditionally the audience boos you.

CHANESKI: It happens.

COULTON: And we'll give you this hint as well. The name of the movie will always be first in this game, followed by the food.

EISENBERG: It's Stanley Kubricks 1971 film on violence, juvenile delinquency and the main ingredient in Mimosas.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth?

LAUTERHAHN: A Clockwork Orange Juice.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And, you know, those oranges were beaten to a pulp.

(LAUGHTER AND GROANS)

COULTON: Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto challenged the system to get experimental drugs to fight AIDS, including a concoction made with bread, turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato and mayo.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Craig?

ERLANDSON: Dallas Buyers Club Sandwich.

COULTON: Delicious and correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right, all right, all right. Jodie Foster plays an FBI agent with a taste for cutlets of baby sheep.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Craig.

ERLANDSON: Silence Of The Lamb Chops?

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: In this classic film, Humphrey Bogart says to Ingrid Bergman, we'll always have Paris, and these cubes of meat on a stick. Think about it.

CHANESKI: I'll assume you have the movie, think of shish blank.

COULTON: Cubes of meat on a stick.

EISENBERG: Classic film.

CHANESKI: Shish blank.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Craig.

EISENBERG: Craig.

ERLANDSON: Casablanca Kebab? Casablancabob. Casablakabob.

COULTON: Yes, very good.

(APPLAUSE)

LAUTERHAHN: It didn't flow.

EISENBERG: It did not flow.

COULTON: It didn't flow, yeah. It was a little more awkward than the other ones, you're right. We're going to cut this whole thing out.

EISENBERG: Play it again lamb.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Of all the gyro joints...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I've written 15 of these. Michael Jordan helps the Looney Tunes play basketball against aliens to win a delicious Creole rice dish similar to paella.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth.

LAUTERHAHN: Space Jambalaya.

EISENBERG: Yes, exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Daniel Day-Lewis plays a creepy oil prospector who says, I drink your milkshake and I eat your congealed animal body fluids.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Elizabeth.

LAUTERHAHN: There Will Be Blood Pudding.

CHANESKI: We'll take it.

COULTON: Yeah...

CHANESKI: Yeah.

COULTON: That's good. Well done.

EISENBERG: We were thinking...

COULTON: Blood sausages, I suppose.

LAUTERHAHN: OK. I like pudding.

EISENBERG: Yeah, we were thinking the other British cuisine that it sounds like a dare. All right, this is your last question. In this early '90s film, Johnny Depp cares for his mentally challenged younger brother by feeding him this gravel based, inexplicably popular breakfast cereal.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Craig.

ERLANDSON: What's Eating Gilbert Grape Nuts?

EISENBERG: Yes, exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: John Chaneski, puzzle guru, how did our contestants do?

CHANESKI: Craig won that round. Congratulations Craig, we'll see you later at our final round.

(MUSIC)

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