A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays Dorie Greenspan struggled to recreate a friend's sweet dessert, but he just wouldn't divulge his secret. "It's nothing," he said. "It's so simple." Turns out, it is simple — once you have the recipe.
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A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays

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A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays

A Boozy Parisian Pineapple That Tastes Like The Holidays

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DORIE GREENSPAN: Mmm, it almost tastes like Christmas.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

When today's found recipe begins with that declaration, Dorie Greenspan has my complete attention.

GREENSPAN: It's a little sweet, spicy, boozy. And it's got pineapple, so it's got a little tang as well.

SHAPIRO: Tang, booze, spice - good for almost any seasonal celebration, if you ask me. The desert is Laurent's Slow-Roasted Spiced Pineapple. It's from Dorie Greenspan's latest cookbook "Baking Chez Moi." It's relatively simple. The only really tricky part was prying it out of the ever evasive Laurent.

GREENSPAN: I live part-time in Paris, and I get my haircut in Paris. Isabelle cuts my hair. I got this recipe from Laurent - Laurent Tavernier, who has the haircutting chair next to Isabelle's. And Laurent's a great cook.

(MUSIC)

GREENSPAN: So I would see these pictures on his phone, but I could never get a recipe. But the pineapple - I knew that this one I was not going to let go.

(MUSIC)

GREENSPAN: It was a pineapple that had been cut in half. And it almost looked candied. And all over the top of the pineapple there were spices, and then there was this beautiful glistening glossy syrup around the edge. It was just beautiful. It sparkled.

(MUSIC)

GREENSPAN: So I said what is it? It's so beautiful. He said, oh, you know, it's just some jam, some orange juice. What did I use? I use brandy. Oh, maybe I used rum and then, you know, whatever spices I had in the cupboard. I said, how much jam? And he put his thumb and index finger in the air and said, oh, you know, about this much. And then he went off and cut someone's hair.

(MUSIC)

GREENSPAN: So I bought a pineapple on my way home, and I tried to make this. And I got something good, but I didn't get what Laurent had. And so I went back. I said, Laurent, I used this much jam. He said, oh, that's not enough. You need more. And so it went. I made this desert three times before I said, OK, look, I've got a pad. I've got a pencil. How much jam? He said, well, the whole jar, of course.

(MUSIC)

GREENSPAN: You know what, it was worth it. This was such a great dessert, and I've served Laurent's pineapple just about every which way. Sometimes I cut the pineapple into spears. I like to serve cookies with it. It's great with pound cake. And, ooh, I forgot to tell you. The syrup - you'll always have too much syrup, and you'll always be thankful. Put that syrup over vanilla ice cream. You'll be so happy.

SHAPIRO: Dorie Greenspan's latest cookbook is "Baking Chez Moi." Detailed instructions for Laurent's Slow-Roasted Spiced Pineapple are on our found recipes page at NPR.org. Enjoy.

(MUSIC)

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