A Cure For The Common Hangover, Found On The Stove Chef Anthony Lamas says posole, a Mexican hominy stew, is great if you're cold, hung over or just had a long night. "It's a cure in a bowl" that's infinitely customizable, he says.
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A Cure For The Common Hangover, Found On The Stove

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A Cure For The Common Hangover, Found On The Stove

A Cure For The Common Hangover, Found On The Stove

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/374053419/374242849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Today's Found Recipe could be the remedy you're looking for tomorrow.

CHEF ANTHONY LAMAS: If you're cold, you're hungover, you've had a long night, posole is that Latino cure for you in a bowl.

SIEGEL: That's right - don't head to the medicine cabinet, head directly to the stove and that simmering pot of posole. It's a traditional hominy stew from Mexico.

LAMAS: It's usually made on a Saturday night and usually eaten on Sundays.

SIEGEL: But Chef Anthony Lamas says it's also perfect for tomorrow - New Year's Day. He's the owner of the restaurant Seviche in Louisville, Kentucky, and he's known for his posole. Lamas learned to make this stew from his mother. She always served it right after a big party.

LAMAS: As long as I can remember, it's, like, what they ate. You know, everybody was kind of hungover. It was, like, you know, it's time for a bowl of posole to get me right.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LAMAS: It just really - I guess it's that comfort thing, you know, there's a little spice to it. There's some texture from the cabbage and the onions and the fresh cilantro and the lime and you got the chunks of pork. You could smell the hominy too, that nice corn flavor, just kind of simmering in there. And it makes you feel good. You're sweating a little bit from the chilies. It gets all those impurities out.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LAMAS: I'm from California originally. My father's from Puerto Rico, my mother's from Mexico. Posole was one of those early memories that I saw the ingredients coming in and mom prepping, I just thought oh, OK, there's going to be - there's people coming over. My aunts and uncles are coming over.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LAMAS: My mom thought I was nosy, you know, because I always wanted to be around, but it's like she be trying to get me to bed and, mom, I can't sleep. I'm hungry and she's like have a glass of milk. And I'm like that's not doing it. I'm smelling this posole and I can smell the onions and the broth simmering all night and it just would make me toss and turn in my bed. And I couldn't wait until the next morning, but no, this posole is keeping me awake.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LAMAS: So she would make a posole verde - meaning green - tomatillos, poblanos. The thing about posole is it's about letting it simmer and getting all that flavor in there and then all these toppings that you add to it - maybe some crackers and a little cheese and a little onion. You're always going to see cabbage and lime and cilantro, but you might not always see radishes or you might not always see warm tortillas. Everybody can do their own version. Posole - it's like the Latino chili so to speak.

SIEGEL: That's chef Anthony Lamas, now based in Louisville, Kentucky. There's still time to get your pot of posole simmering on the stove. In case you want to try out his Latino cure for a hangover, go to our Found Recipes page at npr.org for details.

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