Sen. Rubio Says He Could Run For President Even If Jeb Bush Does : The Two-Way The Florida Republican tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that while he had not made a final decision on a run, "we're closer to a decision than we were a month ago."
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Sen. Rubio Says He Could Run For President Even If Jeb Bush Does

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Sen. Rubio Says He Could Run For President Even If Jeb Bush Does

Sen. Rubio Says He Could Run For President Even If Jeb Bush Does

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news - we are nearing a high point of the presidential book season. Several potential candidates have books coming out soon. Serious contenders of course can use books like these to get their message out, and their book tours become shadow campaigns. One book out in January will come from Florida Senator Marco Rubio. It's a book on economic opportunity called "American Dreams." Elsewhere in today's program, we questioned Rubio about the new Republican Congress. Right now, we'll hear just a bit more about Rubio's own ambitions. He's considering whether to run for president. But in recent days, another Floridian, ex-Governor Jeb Bush, says he's exploring a run, too. And also incidentally putting out his own e-book. They are both part of the same political network, which leads to a question for Rubio.

Do you think that the state of Florida and its donors and political supporters, activists can support two presidential candidates at once?

SENATOR MARCO RUBIO: Well, first, let me say I have tremendous respect for Governor Bush. And I've said repeatedly, if he runs, he'll be a very credible candidate, potentially the front runner, at least in the early stages because of all the strengths and advantages that he brings to the process. As far as, you know, speculating about whether two people from this same state can run - it's not unprecedented. We certainly know a lot of the same people, we also know some different people. The decision I have to make is where is the best place for me to serve America, to carry out this agenda that I have to restore the American dream given the dramatic economic changes we've had in the 21st century. Where is the best place for me to achieve that? Is it in the Republican majority in the Senate or is that as candidate and ultimately as president of the United States. If I decided its president, then that's what I'm going to do irrespective of who else might be running.

INSKEEP: What's your gut been telling you as you spend the holidays where you are?

RUBIO: Well, this is not a gut decision. This is one that one needs to make obviously on the bases of facts and reality. And so, you know, I haven't made a decision yet on it. I don't have a date in mind or timeframe in mind, but it's certainly soon. We're closer to a decision than we were a month ago.

INSKEEP: That's Florida Republican senator Marco Rubio. He talks with us elsewhere in today's program and at npr.org about the new Congress, Iran and immigration.

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