Groovy Movie In this game, guess two rhyming movie titles from descriptions of their combined plots. It's really just an excuse for us to talk about White Men Can't Jump and Forrest Gump in the same sentence.

Groovy Movie

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next game is called "Groovy Music." I know - get excited.

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: Actually, it's not.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Oh. You're right. Our next game is called...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...I got so excited. Our next game is called "Groovy Movie."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And here to play it are Robert Pepe and Nicholas Harbison.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Now, sometimes this happens that we just put two contestants together and by pure coincidence they have a lot in common. And here's what you two have in common - you both abandoned a college degree path that you were on at one point.

ROBERT PEPE: Abandoned seems like a strong term.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. Well, what happened, Robert? Why don't you tell me?

PEPE: Well, I was a philosophy major.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

PEPE: I realized that didn't prepare you for a whole lot of much.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I feel like that's part of the course.

(LAUGHTER)

PEPE: So I dropped out and ended up in marketing.

EISENBERG: Yeah. How's that going?

PEPE: That went badly, too.

EISENBERG: Oh, really?

(LAUGHTER)

PEPE: So now I'm in affordable housing and going to school for my master's in childhood special education.

EISENBERG: Well, that's a lovely end to that story.

PEPE: It's a meandering path.

EISENBERG: It's a meandering path - that's a good one. I like that. Nicholas, what happened to your college degree?

NICHOLAS HARBISON: Well, I actually finished my, path, as it were, and I actually have a doctorate in biochemistry.

EISENBERG: Oh, you do? Congratulations.

HARBISON: I do and I hate it. So I now work in retail.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Nice. That is also a meandering path. But in this game - you guys are perfectly suited for this game because we're going to mash-up the plots of two movies whose titles' rhyme, and you have to name both movies. Let's go to our puzzle guru, Mary Tobler, for an example.

MARY TOBLER, BYLINE: If I were to say Ben Affleck plays a CIA agent who helps American hostages escape from Iran and then solves a murder in a small Minnesota town - you betcha - that would be "Argo" and "Fargo."

PEPE: This is going to be a disaster.

(LAUGHTER)

TOBLER: No, it's going to be great.

EISENBERG: So, you don't have to mash-up the titles, right? They just rhyme with each other and you just have to give them both to me. All right, feel free to talk it out.

HARBISON: Robert, I have to tell you, your lack of confidence makes me so excited for this game.

(LAUGHTER)

HARBISON: I think it's going to be a lot of fun for most of us.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know when you'll have to play basketball with Woody Harrelson.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Robert.

PEPE: "Forrest Gump" and "White Men Can't Jump."

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Who's the black private dick who's a sex machine to all the chicks and a firefighting machine also, with Kurt Russell and William Baldwin?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Robert.

PEPE: "Shaft" and "Backdraft?"

COULTON: You got it, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I want that calendar immediately.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy play two law enforcement officers who hunt down a creepy serial killer who stalks you in your dreams.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Robert.

PEPE: "The Heat" and "Nightmare On Elm Street?"

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

PEPE: The audience didn't seem pleased with that.

EISENBERG: The audience gasped at your amazing, gymnastic feat that went on in your cerebral head.

PEPE: Good.

EISENBERG: Yeah, all right.

COULTON: After a washed-up golf pro - played by Kevin Costner - fails to qualify for the U.S. Open, yet again, he decides to run away from it all by tying helium balloons to his house.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Nicholas.

HARBISON: "Tin Cup" and "Up."

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: First 10 minutes of that movie, man. It'll mess you up.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Which one, "Tin Cup?"

EISENBERG: Yeah, "Tin Cup."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Because they're so...

MAN: Heartbreaking.

EISENBERG: ...Heartbreaking. You're like, this is not as funny as "Caddyshack."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Omar Sharif brings Boris Pasternak's Russian novel to life and then gives them the old razzle-dazzle, dancing with Catherine Zeta-Jones and Renee Zellweger.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Nicholas.

HARBISON: "Doctor Zhivago" and "Chicago?"

EISENBERG: Yes, exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Two ridiculously good-looking con men pull off one of the greatest scams in 1930's Chicago and use their winnings to buy a boom box to play Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes" below Ione Skye's window.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Robert.

PEPE: "The Sting" and "Say Anything?"

COULTON: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

PEPE: Really? Wow.

EISENBERG: The only surviving child of the Russian royal family eludes the undead Rasputin, while a mouse in a wizard outfit makes mops dance.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Nicholas.

HARBISON: "Anastasia" and "Fantasia."

EISENBERG: Exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Mary Tobler, puzzle guru - how did our contestants do?

TOBLER: They did wonderfully. It was a close game. Robert's the winner.

(APPLAUSE)

TOBLER: Well done. We'll see you in our final round at the end of the show.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Coming up, we'll talk to our VIP author of "The Interestings" and "The Ten-Year Nap," Meg Wolitzer, about her first young adult novel, so stick around. I'm Ophira Eisenberg and this is NPR's ASK ME ANOTHER.

(APPLAUSE)

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