Produce Samurai Wham! Slice the word "cherry" in half to get "ch" and "erry." Can you guess which rock star's name put the pieces together? Chuck Berry! Your brain will do push-ups in this wordy round.

Produce Samurai

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Say hello to our next contestants, Emanuela Martin-Corrales and Steph Kronenberg

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Steph, you do many things, including making your own furniture?

STEPH KRONENBERG: Well, I'm going to refinish a piece of furniture.

EISENBERG: Oh, OK.

KRONENBERG: But I'm not making it from scratch.

EISENBERG: You're not making it from scratch, but you're a refinisher?

KRONENBERG: I'm going to try.

EISENBERG: You're going to try? Oh, this is a new hobby.

KRONENBERG: I saw some stuff on Pinterest.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. Emanuela is visiting us from Philadelphia.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: She works at a bowling alley. It's pretty cool, right Steph?

KRONENBERG: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Do you bowl as well, I guess?

EMANUELA MARTIN-CORRALES: Yeah. I'm on the team in the league.

EISENBERG: Yeah, of course you are.

MARTIN-CORRALES: Yeah.

EISENBERG: What's your style? I don't know really know how to ask this because I don't know how it works, because...

MARTIN-CORRALES: Goofy.

EISENBERG: Goofy, goofy. How's your team doing?

MARTIN-CORRALES: We're sixth place out of eight.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I think it's going to get better. Have you ever played "Fruit Ninja"?

MARTIN-CORRALES: I've never played it, but I've heard of it.

EISENBERG: All right. How about you, Steph - ever played "Fruit Ninja"?

KRONENBERG: I have no idea what that is.

EISENBERG: All right, well, if you're a fan of "Fruit Ninja," this game is for you.

(LAUGHTER)

KRONENBERG: So not for me.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: If you're not, it's going to be just fine because it's called Produce Samurai.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Each clue will include the name of something you might find in a supermarket produce aisle - could be a fruit, a vegetable or an herb. And what you have to do is chop the word in two pieces, and then you're going to stuff some letters in the middle and you're going to use that to create a new common two-word phrase. Ready?

(LAUGHTER)

KRONENBERG: Ready.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: No. Let's give an example. That sounds impossible.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Let's go to our puzzle guru, John Chaneski.

JOHN CHANESKI, BYLINE: A cherry whizzes by, and after slicing it in two, you find one of rock 'n' roll's legends standing before you. That would be Chuck Berry. The "ch" is in Chuck and the "erry" is at the end of Berry. That's how it works.

EISENBERG: This game is going to play long.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: But it's OK, you can talk it out. So remember the front end of the original word will be the beginning of the first word, and then the back end completes the second word. How's it going?

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN-CORRALES: Sweaty.

EISENBERG: Sweaty?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Shwack (ph) you cut a pear into two and almost die of a cute overload when you see that it's now this animal native to China.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Steph?

KRONENBERG: Panda? Bear.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: A melon flies apart before your sword, replaced by this "Lethal Weapon" actor.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Steph?

KRONENBERG: Mel Gibson.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: After your sword comes down on some nice green kale, in its place is this black-and-white seafaring sister of Shamu.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Emanuela?

MARTIN-CORRALES: Killer whale?

EISENBERG: Yeah, killer whale.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: After splitting some dill clean into two, out comes this Canadian jazz pianist and singer who married Elvis Costello in 2003. Yeah, silence.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Elvis Costello? Jazz piano player? Canadian? You don't care?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. Puzzle guru John Chaneski, can you give them a hint?

CHANESKI: The D-I begins the first name, and the L-L ends the last name.

EISENBERG: That's a great hint.

CHANESKI: That's about as much as I can go.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Steph?

KRONENBERG: Diane Bell?

CHANESKI: Oh, close.

EISENBERG: OK. It's Diana Krall.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: But good try.

A peach flies by, you swing down and find yourself in a southeastern Florida beach-side town.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Peach, yes?

MARTIN-CORRALES: Pebble Beach?

EISENBERG: Oh, interesting.

CHANESKI: No, I'm afraid that's incorrect.

EISENBERG: Oh, says John Chaneski, puzzle guru - N-O.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Steph?

KRONENBERG: Palm Beach.

EISENBERG: Palm beach is what we were looking for, nice.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Only nine more. Here we go.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: You split apart a date, and you get this actor, who starred as Deputy Sheriff Dewey Riley in the "Scream" movies. Yeah, this is what we call a deep cut.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

MARTIN-CORRALES: David Arquette?

EISENBERG: Emanuela got it. David Arquette.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And this is your last clue - chop, chop, you swing at a fig and you get a way of greeting someone favored by boxers and President Obama that spreads a lot fewer germs than shaking hands.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Emanuela?

MARTIN-CORRALES: Fist bump.

EISENBERG: Fist...

MARTIN-CORRALES: Bumping.

EISENBERG: Fist bumping, yes, that is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Nice job both of you. Let's go to our puzzle guru John Chaneski. How did our contestants do?

CHANESKI: We have another tie.

EISENBERG: What?

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: Oh, my. Here's your tiebreaker - with a flourish, you cleave some beans and find yourself with a pair of denim pants.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHANESKI: Steph?

KRONENBERG: Blue jeans.

CHANESKI: Blue jeans is right. Congratulations.

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: Stephanie, we'll see you in our final round at the end of the show.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Coming up, we'll talk to our VIP author Mo Willems about the secret to making children's books that even adults want to read again and again so stick around. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is NPR's ASK ME ANOTHER.

(APPLAUSE)

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