At Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers The Republican National Convention held a gala marking the historic elections of three lawmakers, as the GOP continues its efforts to reach out to communities of color.
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At Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

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At Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

At Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Republican Party is in an all-out push to bring more black voters into their ranks. To this end, the Republican National Committee held its third-annual Trailblazers ceremony this week. It honors the achievements of black Republicans past and present. This year's event also marks the swearing in of the largest group of black Republicans in Congress since Reconstruction. The RNC's event was both a tribute and a showcase for the party's black talent. NPR's Brakkton Booker was there.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING")

UNIDENTIFIED CHOIR: (Singing) Lift every voice and sing 'till Earth and heaven ring.

BRAKKTON BOOKER, BYLINE: From the outset, the RNC got all the atmospherics right. A gospel choir singing the "Black National Anthem" - check. Black co-hosts to emcee the event and a black preacher leading the opening prayer - double check.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PREACHER: Let us go into this program and honor those trailblazers who have led the way for us to follow so that we can continue the path that they have led forward for us.

BOOKER: For this room full of black conservatives, gathered here in Washington, D.C.'s historic Howard Theatre, this was indeed a celebration, a tribute to Republican breakthroughs. There was a video honoring the late Edward Brooke of Massachusetts who passed away last month at 95. He was the first black Republican elected to the Senate in the 20th century.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO TRIBUTE)

EDWARD BROOKE: I go to Washington to do all that I can to stabilize this economy and bring about a responsible society.

BOOKER: The tributes move to present day, to three current lawmakers - Will Hurd of Texas, Mia Love of Utah and Tim Scott of South Carolina. Together, they make up the largest class of black Republicans in Congress since Reconstruction.

Senator Tim Scott.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAILBLAZERS CEREMONY)

SENATOR TIM SCOTT: We, as members of the Conservative Party, owe it to America to go to every single corner of the country, to go into every single neighborhood, not to invite them out, but to lead our ideas in.

BOOKER: While three black Republicans may not seem like many, it is a sign of progress for the GOP. Back in 2012, only 6 percent of African-Americans voted for Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Since that election, the RNC's poured millions into voter engagement efforts with communities of color. The party saw modest but important gains with black voters in last fall's midterms. Representative Love, the only black Republican woman ever elected to Congress, says there's still much work to do.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAILBLAZERS CEREMONY)

CONGRESSMAN MIA LOVE: We need to remove ourselves from a different kind of slavery. And what I'm talking about is the slavery that comes from being dependent on people in power.

BOOKER: Leah Wright Rigueur teaches at Harvard and is the author of the new book "The Loneliness Of The Black Republican." She says, yes, the gains should be applauded, but it's not just about reaching out to African-Americans. She says it's about changing the attitudes of people within the party so that Republicans can attract larger numbers of black voters.

LEAH WRIGHT RIGUEUR: But we're talking about 60 years at minimum of damage that the Republican Party needs overcome. So that's not going to be undone in a matter of months or even a matter of years. This is going to take a full-scale assault.

BOOKER: Republican Chairman Reince Priebus vowed that as long as he's chairman, he's going to continue holding events like this to show how diverse the party is.

REINCE PRIEBUS: We have enough positives coming out of that beta test in 2014 to encourage us that what - we're on the right track, and we can't get off that track.

BOOKER: After all, there is another election next year. Brakkton Booker, NPR News, Washington.

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