For Musician Jack White, Any Old Guacamole Just Won't Do : The Salt Jack White is a meticulous musician, so it's no surprise that his homemade guacamole has to be well crafted, like his music. And Peruvian chef Martin Morales thinks White has a pretty good recipe.
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For Musician Jack White, Any Old Guacamole Just Won't Do

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For Musician Jack White, Any Old Guacamole Just Won't Do

For Musician Jack White, Any Old Guacamole Just Won't Do

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INDIRA LAKSHMANAN, HOST:

Kanye West wants his chauffeur dressed in 100 percent cotton. Jennifer Lopez's coffee must be stirred counterclockwise. Barbra Streisand needs rose petals in the toilet. And the Foo Fighters - they want Cup o' Noodles soup but only on Wednesdays. That is just a taste of the unusual contractual demands that pop stars make of their hosts when they go on tour. They're called riders, and recently another musician's preferences came to light. Jack White, formally of the White Stripes, must hate bananas because he doesn't want to lay eyes on one. He does want chicken wings, fresh blackberries, assorted chocolates and guacamole. In the leaked rider to his contract, White's handlers went into detail about that guacamole, including a very specific recipe from White's manager. Now some people have mocked the diva-ish tone of his request, but London-based Peruvian chef Martin Morales has made it, and he thinks it's just right.

MARTIN MORALES: It's down to the fresh ingredients and the timing of the way each ingredient is put together.

LAKSHMANAN: The ingredients include ripe avocados, serrano peppers, tomatoes, cilantro and lime. Nothing surprising there, but each avocado must be cut three-to-four slits down, three-to-four across, cubed with a butter knife, not mashed. It's to be served around 5 p.m. and not made too far ahead of time. Good calls, Morales says because...

MORALES: If you leave that guacamole sitting there for hours and hours, if you mix it up too much, everything will go limp. And it will just be like a damp, soggy, sloppy salad. No one wants that.

LAKSHMANAN: Morales says that texture isn't the only reason to mix the ingredients right before serving it. It's also about flavor.

MORALES: When two ingredients like chili and lime come together, there are chemical reactions that go on. And they're at their height in the first of two or three minutes. And if you bite into that, then you're also kind of biting into little explosions of flavor. And that's what Jack White's recipe has.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ENTITLEMENT")

JACK WHITE: (Singing) Every time I'm doing what I want to, somebody comes and tells me it's wrong.

LAKSHMANAN: That was Martin Morales, owner of Ceviche restaurant in London. Now if you have a favorite guacamole recipe, please share it with us on our Facebook page, NPR's WEEKEND EDITION. We are hungry, and even a seven nation army couldn't hold us back from a great bowl of guac. [POST-BROADCAST CLARIFICATION: In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that Jack White's concert rider was leaked. In fact, it was released as part of an open records request.]

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