The Sensuous Radical: Pierre Boulez at 90 : Deceptive Cadence Claiming total freedom in sound and color — and making outrageous pronouncements — the tough-minded composer and conductor charted a new course for classical music.
NPR logo

The Sensuous Radical: Pierre Boulez at 90

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395318157/395604794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Sensuous Radical: Pierre Boulez at 90

The Sensuous Radical: Pierre Boulez at 90

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395318157/395604794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

There was once a young firebrand whose revolutionary ideas changed the shape and sound of classical music. I'm not talking about Beethoven. I'm talking about Boulez. Pierre Boulez, the influential French composer and conductor, turned 90 years old today. NPR's Tom Huizenga has this profile.

TOM HUIZENGA, BYLINE: Ah, to be young and rebellious - that was Pierre Boulez right after the Second World War. In his music...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HUIZENGA: And in his musical philosophy...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

PIERRE BOULEZ: Music is in constant evolution, and there is nothing absolutely fixed and rigidly determined.

HUIZENGA: That's Boulez in a 2000 interview with NPR. One thing was fixed in Boulez's mind - the need to shake music up. Once he disrupted a Stravinsky concert and later suggested blowing up the world's opera houses.

PAUL GRIFFITHS: In Britain we had the phrase angry young man.

HUIZENGA: Paul Griffiths wrote the book "Modern Music And After," and says the young Boulez was disillusioned after the war. How could European culture spawn such carnage? Music, like Europe, Boulez thought, would have to be rebuilt. But first he had to tear it down.

GRIFFITHS: The only way to assert himself was to be against everything else, to push through barriers and through destruction to bring about something new.

HUIZENGA: What Boulez created was a new emphasis on sound, color and the very building blocks of music.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID ROBERTSON: This music is as seductive as any on the planet.

HUIZENGA: David Robertson is the music director of the St. Louis Symphony. He spent most of the 1990s in Paris leading Boulez's own orchestra. He's quick to point out the sensual side of the music, like the piece we're hearing, "Notation No. 1."

ROBERTSON: We've been in all the high registers up till this point.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 1")

ROBERTSON: And then it's almost like this bubble bursts.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 1")

ROBERTSON: And goes down into the base. And then it seems to regather its strength from this depth.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 1")

ROBERTSON: And emerge back into the light/

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 1")

HUIZENGA: Now, you might not be able to hum that music, but author Paul Griffiths says that's not the point.

GRIFFITHS: You have to change your idea of what melody and harmony are. The thing is we're all brought up with a huge education in the harmonic system that governed Western music for so long. And that music has taught us how to listen to that music, and it hasn't taught us how to listen to other music.

HUIZENGA: Other music from other countries, for instance, or the 12-tone style of music developed by Arnold Schoenberg in the 1920s, which inspired Boulez. There's a little of both, Griffiths says, in Boulez's 1955 breakthrough - "Le Marteau Sans Maitre" - "The Hammer Without A Master."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LE MARTEAU SANS MAITRE")

GRIFFITHS: He forms a completely new kind of chamber ensemble. It now sounds standard because it has become almost the norm, but then it was completely new

HUIZENGA: There's a singer and a percussionist. plus flute and viola, then a guitar, which hints at Spain, a vibraphone, like Indonesian music, and a xylophone, which conjures up African music.

GRIFFITHS: So it's a kind of world music long before we were talking about world music, but reformed in completely his own way.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LE MARTEAU SANS MAITRE")

HUIZENGA: The piece was evocative and a minor hit for Boulez, but also complicated. Early on the composer was the only one who understood his music well enough to conduct it. And that's how Boulez backed into a second career as a conductor, eventually leading major orchestras in London, New York, Chicago and Cleveland, conducting just about everything.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WATER MUSIC")

HUIZENGA: So why is Boulez conducting Handel? By transforming himself into an all-purpose conductor, Boulez put audiences at ease by performing popular favorites while stealthily inserting contemporary pieces into his concerts.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 2")

HUIZENGA: It's another Boulez innovation still influencing the concert experience today.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NOTATION NO. 2")

HUIZENGA: Over the years, the angry young man has mellowed a bit, but not completely. Boulez has harsh words for composers today who look only to the past and write pretty melodies.

BOULEZ: I find that not dishonest. That's laziness.

HUIZENGA: And when quizzed about the ferocity of his own opinions, Boulez is still rapier quick.

BOULEZ: I am not ferocious at all. I am defining what I think. If you call that ferocity, ferocity is a very cheap way of living.

HUIZENGA: But no one will accuse Boulez of living cheaply, especially fellow conductor David Robertson.

ROBERTSON: There is no B.S. in anything that he's doing either on the page or conducting.

HUIZENGA: At 90, Pierre Boulez remains a protean force for new music through his own compositions, his own orchestra, his high-tech experimental music lab, IRCAM, in Paris. And for a younger generation of artists like David Robertson, Boulez is a beacon, a musical thinker, a provocateur, a pioneer charting new ground.

ROBERTSON: There are relatively few people who have this impact on the world. And Pierre is very definitely up there among the major personalities of the 20th and 21st century.

HUIZENGA: Tom Huizenga, NPR News.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.