Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force : The Two-Way Steve Cook, who heads the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association, tells NPR that soldiers returning from World War II formed biker gangs, which became infamous during a 1947 riot.
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Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

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Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A different form of transportation is at the heart of this next story. Last weekend's brawl involving biker gangs in Waco, Texas, has us thinking about motorcycle gang history. Steve Cook has learned it. He's a law enforcement officer who leads an association tracking motorcycle gangs. He traces them back to World War II veterans who staged a famous event in 1947.

STEVE COOK: What they called a gypsy tour, which was a combination of a drag race and a hill climb that was being held at the San Benito racetrack in Hollister, Calif.

INSKEEP: The event led to a small riot. The riot inspired news coverage and a Marlon Brando movie, "The Wild One." Legitimate bikers tried to denounce the culprits as an outlaw 1 percent of bikers.

COOK: They said, hey, we like being the 1 percent, not only of the biker community, but of society that operates outside the laws and rules.

INSKEEP: Although this is all happening generations ago. Most Americans weren't even alive at the time. How is it that these groups have persisted all these years?

COOK: I think, you know, Sonny Barger gets a great deal of credit.

INSKEEP: Who's that?

COOK: Well, Sonny's kind of an important person in the Hells Angels. He got them into the crime aspect of the group. But also, Sonny was the person that organized the Hells Angels early on as far as, you know, how members were able to join, how individuals charters were set up. And other groups formatted their own gangs after them, and I think that's why this has continued to flourish even this many years later.

INSKEEP: Well, setting aside the Waco incident for a moment, what makes this a problem across the country? By which I mean, what are the kinds of things that gangs are involved in across the United States?

COOK: Drug manufacturing and distribution - that's a staple - motorcycle theft, prostitution, weapons trafficking. It pretty much runs the gamut. And although race is still somewhat of an issue, it's not the issue that it used to be. Now, most of your traditional motorcycle gangs, they still don't want to let African-Americans into the gang. But their support clubs, their underlings if you will, they will let them into those organizations, and they will conduct business with street-gang members, prison-gang members, members of drug cartels, regardless of race.

INSKEEP: From what you just said, I'm presuming that these groups are still overwhelmingly white. Do they tend to be older people, younger people, what?

COOK: For a long time, it was a lot of older people. But they have recognized that if they didn't start recruiting, they were going to die off. And so they have started huge youth movements. And, you know, know anytime we have any kind of military conflict, you have an explosion in motorcycle gang activity because you have a lot of individuals that are affiliated with these groups that are active duty. They get deployed; they meet like-minded people, and they recruit.

INSKEEP: Is it some kind of symptom of post-traumatic stress?

COOK: You know, I think that is definitely part of it. And I think what happens is, you've had all this true camaraderie in the military. Then you get home and everything that you knew previously has kind of been turned on its ear. And so they go around these guys, and they see, hey, you know, they wear a uniform; they wear colors; they have a rank structure; they have rules. And I think for a lot of them, it's like this is what I need.

INSKEEP: So are you a motorcycle rider?

COOK: Absolutely. Yeah, I've got two Harleys. You know, I do the rallies. You know, I go to Sturgis. I do a lot of the same stuff that legitimate motorcycle enthusiasts do. And I think that's important to comment on is there are thousands and thousands of legitimate motorcyclists out there. And legitimate motorcycle enthusiasts don't like these people either.

INSKEEP: When you've been at motorcycle events and around a lot of other motorcyclists, have you ever looked around and recognized a face of someone that you have encountered in your day job?

COOK: Yeah. You know, and that happens pretty frequently, and I get recognized a lot. You know, I've been approached before. You know, one thing that I will give these individuals the, you know, credit where credit is due, they are very respect-based.

INSKEEP: I'm having an image in my head of the old, old cartoon where there's a wolf and a sheepdog, and they are very friendly in the morning on their way to work and say hello and everything. And then they both clock in and go after each other.

COOK: (Laughter) Yeah, that's pretty accurate.

INSKEEP: Well, Steve Cook, thanks very much.

COOK: Yeah, thank you.

INSKEEP: He's executive director of the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association.

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