Some States Make Obamacare Backup Plans, As Supreme Court Decision Looms : Shots - Health News A Supreme Court ruling could threaten health insurance subsidies in about three dozen states. But many states aren't sharing contingency plans lest they be seen as supporting Obamacare.
NPR logo

Some States Make Obamacare Backup Plans, As Supreme Court Decision Looms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/412872578/413069592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Some States Make Obamacare Backup Plans, As Supreme Court Decision Looms

Some States Make Obamacare Backup Plans, As Supreme Court Decision Looms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/412872578/413069592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Another major Supreme Court decision that's expected this month is over the Affordable Care Act. It's about the subsidies many people use to pay for their health insurance. The fight is over whether every Obamacare customer is eligible for those subsidies or only people in the 17 or so states that set up their own online marketplaces. The decision could affect health coverage for millions of people in states that rely on the federal site healthcare.gov. It looks like only a few states have backup plans, including Pennsylvania, as Elana Gordon of member station WHYY reports.

ELANA GORDON, BYLINE: Online marketplaces are a central part of the Affordable Care Act. It's where 27-year-old Kathryn Ryan, a restaurant server in Philadelphia, immediately turned for coverage.

KATHRYN RYAN: I was excited 'cause if it weren't for Obamacare, I wouldn't be insured at all. I wouldn't have the ability to go to the doctor.

GORDON: She can afford it thanks to a $200-a-month discount that brings her premium down to $60. Ryan, who's studying social work, is one of nearly 400,000 Pennsylvanians who've qualified for income-based subsidies. But like a lot of people, she had no idea that a case before the Supreme Court puts those subsidies at risk.

RYAN: You telling me this is like my heart has sank a bit to the bottom of my stomach because I was planning on keeping this insurance until I am gainfully employed with an agency that offers benefits.

GORDON: The reason Ryan and millions of other people's subsidies nationwide are in jeopardy has to do with a lawsuit before the Supreme Court. It argues only those with coverage in state-based marketplaces are eligible for subsidies. If the Supreme Court agrees, Trish Riley with the National Academy for State Health Policy says it could result in what a lot of analysts refer to as a death spiral.

TRISH RILEY: The whole individual market in states could collapse.

GORDON: Without those subsidies, millions would likely drop their coverage except really sick people who need expensive care. So then...

RILEY: Premiums go through the roof.

GORDON: And then no one can afford it. So how are the roughly 34 states with federal marketplaces bracing for this? Pennsylvania actually has a backup plan. Gov. Tom Wolf sent in a blueprint to the feds this past week.

TOM WOLF: I'm just doing this because I want to be prepared.

GORDON: Wolf's plan would create a state-supported market place that still uses healthcare.gov technology but would oversee funding and regulation.

WOLF: My biggest concern is do we have a fallback if we need it?

GORDON: The state's insurance commissioner, Teresa Miller, says it's all been really rushed.

TERESA MILLER: It's forcing us to put together a plan that frankly most states spent years developing, and we're having to do that in - essentially in months.

GORDON: The move is actually pretty unusual, that's according to Joel Ario, a health care consultant.

JOEL ARIO: Pennsylvania stands out.

GORDON: Politically, asking to be a state marketplace is like supporting Obamacare. Wolf, a Democrat, recently defeated a Republican governor, but elsewhere, Ario says lots of state leaders don't want anything to do with the health care law.

ARIO: In about a third of the states, that is a political nonstarter today because it does mean standing up and saying I want to work with this law in a public way as a state-based exchange.

GORDON: Arizona enacted legislation barring any sort of state-based marketplace. A New Jersey spokesperson says it's premature to publicly address any of this, but neighboring Delaware has submitted a contingency plan like Pennsylvania's, says Rita Landgraf, a Delaware health official.

RITA LANDGRAF: Eighty-four percent of Delawareans who purchased on the marketplace receive a financial subsidy, so that is critically important to our constituency that those subsidies are available to them.

GORDON: It's unclear how many other states have plans, but Ario says many are working on the problem at least in some way behind closed doors. Meanwhile, everyone's waiting for the biggest unknown of all - the Supreme Court. A decision is expected by the end of this month. For NPR News, I'm Elana Gordon in Philadelphia.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.