On Your Road-Trip Playlist, The Usual Suspects Plus A Sweet Surprise We asked listeners what songs they like to blast on a long drive. Alongside no-brainers like "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "Hit The Road, Jack" was a 1959 song no one expected.
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On Your Road-Trip Playlist, The Usual Suspects Plus A Sweet Surprise

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On Your Road-Trip Playlist, The Usual Suspects Plus A Sweet Surprise

On Your Road-Trip Playlist, The Usual Suspects Plus A Sweet Surprise

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now a moment of honesty.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We feel like we know you. And when we asked you to help us build a road trip playlist a few weeks ago, we already had an idea what songs you'd recommend.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HIT THE ROAD JACK")

RAY CHARLES: (Singing) Hit the road, Jack, and don't you come back no more, no more, no more, no more. Hit the road, Jack, and don't you come back no more. What you say?

SIEGEL: That song is a no-brainer - "Hit The Road, Jack" by Ray Charles - as is this song.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ON THE ROAD AGAIN")

WILLIE NELSON: (Singing) On the road again. Just can't wait to get on the road again.

CORNISH: Yep, Willie Nelson. It wasn't fate, people. It was obvious. "On The Road Again" is a classic driving song.

SIEGEL: As is this rock ballad, a hit in 1976 and again in '92.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY")

QUEEN: (Singing) I see a little silhouetto of a man. Scaramouche, scaramouche, will you do the fandango? Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening.

SIEGEL: Don't be frightened. That, of course, is "Bohemian Rhapsody" by Queen.

CORNISH: And yes, we knew it would show up repeatedly among the thousands of suggestions you sent in for our road trip playlist.

SIEGEL: But this next song did catch us by surprise.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M ON MY WAY")

BARBARA DANE: (Singing) I'm on my way, and I won't turn back. I'm on my way, and I won't turn back.

SIEGEL: That's Barbara Dane, a social activist and musician. In the late 1950s, jazz critic Leonard Feather called her Bessie Smith in stereo.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M ON MY WAY")

DANE: (Singing) I'm on my way. Don't you know I am on my way? But I would ask my brother why don't you go with me?

SIEGEL: "I'm On My Way" is from Living with the Blues, a 1959 album Barbara Dane recorded with Earl Father Hines and the Kenny Whitson quartet. That album is a worthy detour from the ALL THINGS CONSIDERED road trip playlist if you want to take it.

CORNISH: And you can find other surprises on our playlist at npr.org. It's now 89 songs and still growing.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M ON MY WAY")

DANE: (Singing) Yes, if he said no, I'll go anyhow. If he said no...

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