How To Take A Picture-Perfect Presidential Candidate Selfie : It's All Politics This election has been called the "selfie election." It turns out there's an art to the political selfie. And with this many candidates running for president, they are in need of some advice.
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How To Take A Picture-Perfect Presidential Candidate Selfie

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How To Take A Picture-Perfect Presidential Candidate Selfie

How To Take A Picture-Perfect Presidential Candidate Selfie

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Presidential candidates have a lot of demands on their time, and a lot of demands for selfies - people with arms outstretched who want to cozy-up and pose with them. NPR's Tamara Keith has this tutorial for the modern candidate.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Pics, or it didn't happen - it's a common refrain these days. You can't just experience life, you have to document it. And so when fans line up to shake hands with a presidential candidate, a handshake often really isn't enough.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: You want to take a selfie with me?

BRIAN DONAHUE: Selfies are here to stay. They're a part of American culture, and sure enough, they're going to, you know, be prominent in the 2016 presidential election.

KEITH: Brian Donahue is the founder and CEO of CRAFT Media-Digital, a political committee communications firm. For candidates, he says, taking selfies with supporters has to be part of a broader digital campaign strategy.

DONAHUE: I think selfies are a real exciting visual way for people to show support and say that this is a candidate I'm behind, I'm excited about, I want to share that in my own social network.

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CLAY AIKEN: Hey, let's take a picture together.

UNIDENTIFIED GIRL #1: OK.

UNIDENTIFIED GIRL #2: OK.

KEITH: Clay Aiken, "American Idol" runner-up turned unsuccessful Congressional candidate was a master of the campaign selfie. Rather than waiting for people to figure out their phones and fumble around, he'd just grab it and shoot himself, something he described to me last fall.

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AIKEN: I started doing it 'cause everybody has the same phones, but nobody knows how to use anybody else's. So it was just easier for me to take them myself.

KEITH: That gave him a certain amount of control over the camera angle.

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AIKEN: See, I can always do it and make myself look like you can't see all the chins I've added from eating so much.

KEITH: That's right, candidates, when executed correctly - shot just above eye level - a selfie can be slimming. For more advice on the perfect selfie, I turned to an expert from outside the political world.

STEPHANIE SALTZMAN: My name is Stephanie Saltzman. I am the associate digital editor for allure.com.

KEITH: And she's the author of an article titled, "How To Look Good In A Selfie."

SALTZMAN: As long as it seems genuine, you know, like, a real smile and just sort of like you're having fun with it then it's going to be flattering, and it's not - you know, it's going to be something that reads well to the public, I think.

KEITH: If there were a record for most selfies taken with 2016 presidential candidates, Maggie Fitzgerald from Des Moines might hold it. She's taken selfies with everyone from Hillary Clinton to Scott Walker and Donald Trump, and she has a suggestion for candidates.

MAGGIE FITZGERALD: I would say go in with a great attitude because it does make an impression.

KEITH: There's one candidate - who she wouldn't name - who she says had a bad attitude.

FITZGERALD: I know it sounds stupid, but it's not that I'm going to - whoever takes the best selfie or whoever comes in with the best attitude I'll caucus for. It's more of, are you a jerk to everybody?

KEITH: So just embrace it, says Allure's Saltzman.

SALTZMAN: If you try to fight it, you're going to look awkward and like you're just very out of touch, I think.

KEITH: Resistance is futile.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: We have an exclusive policy that for people who wear the T-shirts, we do selfies.

KEITH: Tamara Keith, NPR News.

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