Alice Waters, Healthy Food Advocate, Receives Humanities Medal : The Salt President Obama awarded chef and author Alice Waters with the National Humanities Medal on Thursday. The advocate of sustainable eating explains what it means to have her work recognized this way.
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Alice Waters, Healthy Food Advocate, Receives Humanities Medal

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Alice Waters, Healthy Food Advocate, Receives Humanities Medal

Alice Waters, Healthy Food Advocate, Receives Humanities Medal

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We had a visitor here yesterday, Alice Waters, the famous chef and writer and past guest on MORNING EDITION. She's best known for her restaurant Chez Panisse, which helped to popularize organic, local ingredients. When she came by, she looked a little different. Hanging from her neck was a bronze medal on a red ribbon, a National Humanities Medal. President Obama had just given it to Waters. We asked this advocate of sustainable eating what it meant to be recognized in that way.

ALICE WATERS: We talk about the humanities, all the beautiful things that are cultural experiences for us and lift our spirits. And yet we've never really talked about food that way. Food has always been like fuel, and now it's considered to be something that really lifts our spirits. And when food and agriculture are put together and we're in the rhythm of nature, it brings us back to the table where a cultural conversation can happen.

INSKEEP: Glad she dropped by - Alice Waters, chef, advocate and now recipient of the National Humanities Medal, right here on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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