Female Astronauts Discuss What It's Like To Be In Space Three astronauts and the chief scientist of NASA — all women — stopped by NPR headquarters in Washington, D. C., on Tuesday to talk about space exploration.
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Female Astronauts Discuss What It's Like To Be In Space

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Female Astronauts Discuss What It's Like To Be In Space

Female Astronauts Discuss What It's Like To Be In Space

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yesterday, three women walked into NPR here in Washington, D.C. wearing flight jackets. They were dressed in the casual wear of astronauts, which is what they are. They held a social media chat with our science blogger Adam Cole, who moderated questions from all over the world.

ADAM COLE, BYLINE: From Eden (ph) in Israel, what does it feel like to be in space? Do you feel the organs floating inside your body?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wow, that question went to the Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, who spent seven months on the International Space Station.

SAMANTHA CRISTOFORETTI: I felt instantly at home in space. I enjoy so much that feeling of being light, especially for the first weeks. And I just enjoyed going to eat on the ceiling or hanging out on the wall. I just felt like I had to take advantage of this living in three dimensions. So that was awesome.

MONTAGNE: American astronaut Cady Coleman took a question about dreaming in space.

CADY COLEMAN: I definitely dreamed weightless. And then I would dream that way when I got home. And then part of me would go, oh, no, it's not the right way anymore.

COLE: Was that an unpleasant surprise, to wake up and feel...

COLEMAN: Well, you know, there's that waking up in the middle of the night when you might, like, get up and, you know, use the bathroom. And I would just think, oh, I'd have to walk. I'm not going to do that.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: Both women said they loved the experience of space, though not the food.

CRISTOFORETTI: My biggest craving when I got back - and so I wish it had been up there - is, like, a big salad with a lot of, like, fresh tomatoes and mozzarella and nuts.

COLEMAN: I missed things that were crunchy because things like potato chips were just impossible to eat. You'd have a cloud of potato chips. One day, I hope they're able to get warm oatmeal chocolate chip cookies up there. That would be awesome.

INSKEEP: Now I'm hungry. Those are the astronauts Cady Coleman and Samantha Cristoforetti, who, along with NASA colleague Dr. Serena Aunon, took questions from NPR on social media yesterday.

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