Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants : The Salt Meyer says "something fascinating and completely unfair" plagues the restaurant industry: Waiters' incomes have risen far faster than other staff. To balance salaries out, he'll charge more for food.
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Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants

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Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants

Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

People going to upscale restaurants in New York City, like The Modern or Gramercy Tavern, might soon notice something new on their menus - higher prices. That's because the man in charge of those restaurants and a bunch of other well-known eateries is doing away with tipping. Danny Meyer is the CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group, and I asked him why.

DANNY MEYER: I think that restaurant patrons have unwittingly believed that they could, if they wanted to, use their tip to punish bad service and/or to praise great service. What that's done over the years has actually been quite the opposite because the average American restaurant-goer leaves the exact same tip irrespective of the service they receive. And unfortunately, none of those tips that you leave in a restaurant may be shared with the full team - i.e. the cooks, the dishwashers, the prep cooks, the butchers, et cetera.

MCEVERS: So how do you plan to sort of bridge that gap between what servers make and cooks make by doing away with tipping?

MEYER: Well, over the past 30 years since I've been a restaurateur, we've seen something kind of fascinating and completely unfair. Waiters' income in a fine-dining restaurant has gone up well over 200% - two reason. Menu prices have gone up, and the average tip that people leave has actually gone up from around 15 percent in 1985 to about 21 percent today. Meanwhile, back of house workers who don't have the opportunity to share in tips have seen their hourly wage go up no more than about 22 to 25 percent.

So by incorporating everything in the menu prices and therefore having it be the restaurant's responsibility to pay everybody a fair wage, we think we have the opportunity to make a great place to work for everybody, not just servers but also for our cooks and even for our entry-level managers.

I don't know if most people are aware, but if you're going to be a waiter who wants to grow your career, your profession in the restaurant business and you want to become a manager, which is the likely next step, you actually have to take a 25 percent cut, and that's kind of untenable for most people. We're going to change that.

MCEVERS: How much are menu prices going to go up, then? I mean, are we talking the 15 or 20 percent that's not going to be paid in tips now?

MEYER: Our hope is that when you get your credit card bill at the end of the month and you look at the amount you paid - and we will be launching this at our restaurant The Modern at the Museum of Modern Art in mid-November. But when you get your bill, it should look just about exactly as it would of if you had left your gratuity in the old days.

MCEVERS: Are you saying that you really want to hold firm to no higher than 20 percent increase?

MEYER: The average tip that people leave in our restaurants is 21 percent, and we're going to try as hard as we can to keep our prices in that realm.

MCEVERS: And one of the motivations behind this - right? - is that it's hard to hire cooks in cities like New York City where the cost of living is high, no?

MEYER: We've never faced a labor shortage the way we have right now, and especially if you're in New York City. It's no longer necessary to have to work in a fine-dining restaurant when, all of a sudden, we see that the fast food industry, by law, is going to be raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour. So why would you tell your parents, gee, please help me pay the bills for a culinary education so I can make less than that in a white-tablecloth restaurant?

MCEVERS: Do you think other restaurants will follow?

MEYER: Well, I really hope they will. I think that there's a number - huge number - of colleagues in our industry who will be watching very, very closely. We felt a responsibility to go first, and we're proud to do it because it's the right thing to do. And I really think you're going to see this happen all over the country.

MCEVERS: That's Danny Meyer. He's the CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group. Thank you so much.

MEYER: Thank you very much.

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