At Pennsylvania Resort, Vacationers May Ski Uphill Skiers making their way uphill won't have to pay for a lift ticket. They will, however, have to pay for a pass to allow them up the slope, according to the Daily American newspaper.
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At Pennsylvania Resort, Vacationers May Ski Uphill

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At Pennsylvania Resort, Vacationers May Ski Uphill

At Pennsylvania Resort, Vacationers May Ski Uphill

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. A Pennsylvania resort will let you ski uphill. You get traction, as skiers know, by attaching fabric called skins to the bottom of your skis. And the Seven Springs Mountain Resort says it will let people climb slopes under their own power. The Daily American newspaper reports this will save paying for a lift ticket. However, just like a bank that charges you an ATM fee but also for using a teller, you must buy a pass to drag yourself up the slope. It's MORNING EDITION.

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