Yiddish Proverb, Klingon Proverb, Or Bob Marley Lyric? In this installment of This, That or The Other, contestants must determine the origin of some unusual phrases.
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Yiddish Proverb, Klingon Proverb, Or Bob Marley Lyric?

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Yiddish Proverb, Klingon Proverb, Or Bob Marley Lyric?

Yiddish Proverb, Klingon Proverb, Or Bob Marley Lyric?

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JONATHAN COULTON: It's time for another installment of that ASK ME ANOTHER classic - This, That or The Other. Let's welcome our next two contestants, John Rosenberger and Elliot Chalom.

(APPLAUSE)

FAITH SALIE, HOST:

Hi, guys.

COULTON: So I have a question for both of you. Think carefully. John, would you rather travel forward in time or backward in time?

JOHN ROSENBERGER: Backward in time.

COULTON: Why?

ROSENBERGER: Because I've just always been more fascinated with the past than what's coming up in the future.

COULTON: You're going to have to give up your iPhone, you understand that, right?

SALIE: But he'd look good in spats, I feel.

ROSENBERGER: Yeah.

COULTON: You do look like a spats kind of guy. Do you have spats?

ROSENBERGER: Not on me.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Do you actually have spats at home?

ROSENBERGER: No.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Do you know where you can get some?

ROSENBERGER: Yeah, probably my dad's house.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Because your dad is from 1894?

ROSENBERGER: Yeah, well, he is 87 years old.

SALIE: Really?

ROSENBERGER: Yeah.

SALIE: Whoa.

COULTON: Elliot, how about you? Would you rather travel forward in time or backward in time?

ELLIOT CHALOM: Also backward in time.

COULTON: Really?

CHALOM: Yeah.

COULTON: Neither one of you is interested in the future? You monsters. Why would you rather go back into the past?

CHALOM: I really like "Back To The Future" one better than two.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: And so maybe you go back to the past and fix the script for "Back To The Future Two," is that it?

CHALOM: I think that's what I would do, yeah.

COULTON: In this next game, we're going to give you a phrase and all you have to do it tell us to which of three categories it belongs. Now, for this found, each clue is a profound saying, but the question is, is it an old Yiddish proverb...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: ...An old Klingon proverb...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: ...Or a Bob Marley lyric?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: So...

SALIE: (Laughter).

COULTON: ...For each phrase, just tell us - were these the words of an old Eastern European language, a made-up "Star Trek" language, or a legendary Jamaican reggae singer?

SALIE: Ring in when you know the answer, but if you get it wrong, your opponent can steal. The winner will move on to the final round at the end of the show. And remember - is it a Yiddish proverb, a Klingon proverb or a Bob Marley lyric?

When a worm sits in horseradish, it thinks there's nothing sweeter.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: John.

ROSENBERGER: Yiddish proverb.

SALIE: Well done, mazel tov.

ROSENBERGER: Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Also, worms are not very smart. That's really the meaning behind that proverb.

Never make a politician grant you a favor. They will always want to control you forever.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Elliot.

CHALOM: Klingon.

COULTON: No, I'm sorry, it is not a Klingon proverb. John, do want to take a guess there?

ROSENBERGER: Bob Marley lyric.

COULTON: That's right, it's a Bob Marley lyric.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: But I agree with you, Elliot, it's right on the edge. It could have gone either way.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Gentlemen, if you don't want to grow old, hang yourself when you're young.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: So true.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: John.

ROSENBERGER: Bob Marley?

SALIE: I'm afraid that's not right.

CHALOM: I'll go Yiddish.

SALIE: Elliott, I'm going to plotz. You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Death is an experience best shared.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John.

ROSENBERGER: Klingon.

COULTON: Yes, obviously Klingon.

SALIE: Jonathan, I was wondering if you might be able to say that to us in Klingon.

ROSENBERGER: Yes, my accent is a little rusty.

SALIE: Sure.

ROSENBERGER: But it goes like this, (speaking Klingon).

COULTON: Was that accent pretty good faith? I know you were on Star Trek.

SALIE: I was on "Deep Space 9."

COULTON: So you've spent some time with Klingons.

SALIE: You know, I wasn't with Klingons. I was a genetically-enhanced mutant.

COULTON: Oh yeah, right.

SALIE: I don't mean to brag.

COULTON: No.

SALIE: They did not have to put ridges in my forehead.

COULTON: You didn't have any special head make-up?

SALIE: No, I didn't. I didn't. But it was a good time. Yeah. And I, for one, would like to go into the future.

COULTON: Yeah, right? Because you get cool stuff. Spats - nobody wants spats.

SALIE: Alright, guys - to really succeed, you must enjoy eating poison.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: Elliot.

CHALOM: Yiddish?

SALIE: I'm afraid that's not right. Would you like to steal, John?

ROSENBERGER: Bob Marley.

SALIE: No, guys.

COULTON: One more guess.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: It is...

COULTON: Too little, too late, Elliot.

SALIE: It is a Klingon proverb. I feel that the Klingon proverbs are really the darkest, right? It's very mordant.

ROSENBERGER: They're all pretty depressing.

COULTON: Yeah, they're all pretty depressing.

You can't empty the ocean with a spoon.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John.

ROSENBERGER: Bob Marley.

COULTON: No, I'm sorry.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I didn't think this was going to be so hard, but it is very hard. Elliot, do you know the answer? There's two possibilities.

CHALOM: That's Yiddish.

COULTON: It is absolutely a Yiddish proverb. That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

SALIE: The hotter the battle, the sweeter ja (ph) victory.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: Elliot.

CHALOM: Bob Marley lyric.

SALIE: Yeah, Bob Marley lyric.

COULTON: That was a bit of a gift, that clue. This is your last question.

You cannot loosen a man's tongue with root beer.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Elliot.

CHALOM: Klingon.

COULTON: Yes, it is a Klingon proverb. Wow.

(APPLAUSE)

SALIE: You know, I know how to say great in Klingon - maj (ph). Maj (ph), Elliot.

CHALOM: Maj (ph)- majel tov (ph).

COULTON: Greg Pliska, how did our contestants do?

GREG PLISKA: Well, that was a very close match, but Elliot, you have emerged as our winner, and we'll be seeing you for the final round at the end of the show.

(APPLAUSE, SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

COULTON: Coming up, we'll play a music game that will stay with you all week long. I apologize in advance. So please stick around. I'm Jonathan Coulton, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER, from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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