Thin Mint Mashup: Grind Those Girl Scout Cookies Into Cheesecake : The Salt Many of us cheer Girl Scout season, but after plowing through several sleeves of Samoas, fatigue can set in. Here, Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful, offers recipes meant to rekindle the cookie love.
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Thin Mint Mashup: Grind Those Girl Scout Cookies Into Cheesecake

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Thin Mint Mashup: Grind Those Girl Scout Cookies Into Cheesecake

Thin Mint Mashup: Grind Those Girl Scout Cookies Into Cheesecake

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

With apologies to Andy Williams, now is the most wonderful time of the year. For it is Girl Scout cookie season. But after plowing through several sleeves of thin mints, fatigue can set in. You know what I'm talking about. So we wondered, when you have started to feel sick of Girl Scout Cookies, is there a way to rekindle the love? Here to help us is Dan Pashman, host of "The Sporkful" podcast at WNYC studios. Hey, Dan.

DAN PASHMAN: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: All right. So the other day I'm sitting around, and and we're in the office. And I'm just looking at boxes and boxes of Girl Scout Cookies. They were never-ending. And I was just like, I can't take one more Samoa.

PASHMAN: That's right. Do you find that the creative output of WEEKEND EDITION rises and falls with the consumption of Girl Scout Cookies?

MARTIN: (Laughter) In which direction?

PASHMAN: Well, it's a bell curve, I think. (Laughter). And that's one thing I want to say before we get into diagnosing your issue here, is that there's a problem with Girl Scout Cookies, a couple of problems that tie into your issue.

MARTIN: OK.

PASHMAN: First of all, I think they're in danger of flooding the market. Girl Scout cookie season is longer than it used to be...

MARTIN: It is.

PASHMAN: With online ordering and everything.

MARTIN: Yes.

PASHMAN: They used to have a great, you know, artificial scarcity that made it such a special time of year. And now I fear that they're losing that. And they're losing people like you, who are not going to be so excited the next time they come around. The other marketing issue that I think is confronting the Girl Scout Cookies is their naming, the nomenclature 'cause there's two different bakers that make them. And in different regions, the same cookie can have two different names.

MARTIN: So I didn't even know that - this whole Samoa-Caramel deLites thing.

PASHMAN: That's right. In fact, the only cookie of the canonical cookies that is the same by both bakers is Thin Mints.

MARTIN: All right. So let's get to the heart of this issue, which is I need something else to do with these cookies 'cause I don't want to eat them on their own anymore.

PASHMAN: I think let's start with something simple and work our way up. If you're getting tired of Girl Scout Cookies, the first thing I would say is consider altering their serving temperature. For Thin Mints, store them in the fridge.

MARTIN: Yes.

PASHMAN: You put a little chill on the mint. It brings that spark of a fresh mint flavor to the fore. It will reinvigorate your Thin Mints. Samoas, or Caramel deLites, I would recommend warming them a little bit. Get that caramel and that chocolate a little oozy.

MARTIN: OK.

PASHMAN: If you want to get a little more complicated, you could start adding a savory element.

MARTIN: Could you?

PASHMAN: You could. I've done experimentation combining potato chips with Samoas...

MARTIN: Come on.

PASHMAN: Or Caramel deLites. Yes. You put a thin spread of cream cheese on the top, and then you can fuse a potato chip to it. You're adding crunch and you're adding salt.

MARTIN: With the cream cheese, that's brave.

PASHMAN: I mean, you would have a cheesecake with all of these components in it.

MARTIN: You're right. OK.

PASHMAN: And speaking of cheesecake, that's my next recommendation to you. So I've got this friend, Emily Konn. She runs this company called Vail Custom Cakes. And she makes the best cheesecake I've ever had in my life. And I asked her to design a Girl Scout Cookie cheesecake for my book. And she did it. And it's called Girl Scout Cookie Unity Cheesecake. It has three different Girl Scout Cookies crushed up in the crust. It has Samoas lining the bottom, and then it has the peanut butter patties or tagalongs floating throughout the cheesecake. The other thing that Emily makes is called her Tipsy Girl Scouts. These are cupcakes that are devil's food cupcakes soaked with Malibu rum.

MARTIN: Oh.

PASHMAN: Then she adds chocolate ganache and a vanilla bean caramel buttercream and toasted coconut. She basically makes a cupcake out of the root ingredients of a Samoa.

MARTIN: That sounds delicious.

PASHMAN: Right?

MARTIN: OK, I feel better. I feel renewed in my love and appreciation of the Girl Scout Cookie. Dan Pashman, he's host of "The Sporkful" podcast. He's also the author of "Eat More Better." That's where you can find that cheesecake recipe as well as on our website. Hey, Dan, thanks so much.

PASHMAN: Take care, Rachel. Good luck getting through those cookies.

MARTIN: Hey, thanks.

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