Able Was I Buckle up in your racecar and get ready to ride, because this game is all about palindromes! Each answer is a word that can be read the same both forwards and backwards.
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Able Was I

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Able Was I

Able Was I

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next contestant is joining us on the phone. Hello, you're on ASK ME ANOTHER.

ROBERT HUTCHISON: Hi, this is Robert Hutchison calling from Lawrence, Kan.

EISENBERG: Oh, hello, Robert Hutchison. Welcome. So you just moved there, right, to Kansas from Atlanta?

HUTCHISON: Yeah, I just moved here last fall from the big city.

EISENBERG: And what is one of the big differences you've noticed?

HUTCHISON: The biggest difference has got to be the driving out here. In Atlanta, the best defense is a good offense. And out here, they don't have any of that maniacal, naked aggression. Everyone's nice. They give you space. They stay safely behind your car. It's very suspicious.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I can tell you would hate that.

HUTCHISON: Yeah, I just don't know what to do with all the kindness. It's still freaking me out.

EISENBERG: (Laughter). Get excited, everybody, because it's time for a game about palindromes. A palindrome is, of course, a word or phrase that reads the same way forwards and backwards, like racecar. In this game, the answer to every clue is a palindrome. And Robert, if you get enough right, we'll send you an ASK ME ANOTHER Rubik's Cube. Here we go. This watercraft, originally used by the Inuit, can be particularly useful when surfing the web to find your next travel deal.

HUTCHISON: It's a kayak.

EISENBERG: That is correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: In Morse code, dot, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash, dot, dot, dot?

HUTCHISON: SOS.

EISENBERG: Correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This compact Honda model has been around for over 40 years, performing its duties throughout the world.

HUTCHISON: Civic?

EISENBERG: Yes, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It is a boring name for a car. Honda jury duty.

(LAUGHTER)

HUTCHISON: Even worse.

EISENBERG: The world's largest fashion magazine shares its name with an Australian supermodel.

HUTCHISON: Elle?

EISENBERG: Elle. Yes, your computer got that right.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This drug is often prescribed to treat anxiety and panic disorders and alphabetically appears somewhere near the end of the aisle.

HUTCHISON: Xanax.

EISENBERG: Yes, exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is your last clue. This cable channel, based in Atlanta, is known for explosive programming.

HUTCHISON: TNT.

EISENBERG: TNT is correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Robert, you did fantastic. You are getting an ASK ME ANOTHER Rubik's Cube. Thank you so much for playing.

(APPLAUSE)

HUTCHISON: Thank you very much.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CALL ME")

BLONDIE: (Singing) On the line you can call me any day or night. Call me.

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