In London, Life Goes on Amid New Attacks In London today, explosions struck three Underground stations and a city bus. Police reported one person was injured in the blasts that came two weeks to the day after four explosions in London killed 56 people and injured hundreds. NPR's Loren Jenkins says Londoners are reacting as they do in any emergency, with their usual stoicis.
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In London, Life Goes on Amid New Attacks

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In London, Life Goes on Amid New Attacks

In London, Life Goes on Amid New Attacks

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And we are preparing at this moment to bring you a press conference by British Prime Minister Tony Blair who will be speaking at 10 Downing Street. He will be giving a statement. He has said he will not be answering questions. He'll be talking about the four explosions on the London Underground and a bus earlier today. The police have evacuated three of these subway stations and a bomb exploded on that bus in London. Police say one person has been injured but they are not treating the situation as a major incident, they have been calling it a serious incident. Emergency teams have been sent to the Warren Street, Shepherd's Bush and Oval Underground stations. The driver of the bus was quoted as saying, "A window was blown out but the bus experienced no structural damage." And Linda Wertheimer is with us, also Loren Jenkins, our foreign editor.

One thing about these explosions that is quite startling, I guess, is that they came exactly two weeks to the day after the explosions of July 7th. And I suppose the--as people have said--the somewhat upside of it is that they are much--they have clearly done much less damage and no casualties to speak of.

Linda.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

British intelligence expert Anthony Glees, who we spoke to earlier this morning, Loren, suggested that there was some sort of significance to the notion that two weeks later--14 days later after 7/7 as he calls the incident in London--that there's some sort of significance that terrorists have attached to these multiples.

LOREN JENKINS (NPR Foreign Editor): Well I think there is significance in that fact that they can still operate after all the upgrade of security that has gone on in London since the last attacks. The fact that even though these are small bombs, apparently, haven't caused the casualties the last ones did. It's significant that they can still coordinate an attack on the London subway and bus systems the way they have.

WERTHEIMER: There apparently have been three incidents on the Underground and one on a bus, three explosions, one of those was on a bus. Now no serious injuries reported, although the BBC has reported that there is one injury. And local police--police have cordoned off the various areas, evacuated buildings and are making attempts to discover anybody who may have been or may be involved in these explosions. So there's a considerable amount of disruption in downtown London today, but nothing like there was two weeks ago.

JENKINS: Well the good thing about the British is--the good thing about the British is they know how to handle these sort of things.

WERTHEIMER: Loren Jenkins, thanks very much. You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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