Moves Like Frogger Scrounge up your quarters because we're heading to the arcade! In this game, Jonathan Coulton tweaks Maroon 5's song "Moves Like Jagger" to be about classic video games.

Moves Like Frogger

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

This is ASK ME ANOTHER, NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and trivia. I'm your host, Ophira Eisenberg here with puzzle guru Art Chung and house musician Jonathan Coulton. And we are coming to you from the Chicago Comic and Entertainment Expo.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Let's meet our next two contestants. John Robinson, you had your own radio show...

JOHN ROBINSON: Yes.

EISENBERG: ...In college.

ROBINSON: In college, yes.

EISENBERG: So what's a memorable moment from your college radio days?

ROBINSON: I once got a thank you call from jail. I was doing the show and halfway through playing a song, the phone rings. I pick it up. It said you have a collect call from - play Stone Temple Pilots - at Porter County Jail.

(LAUGHTER)

ROBINSON: I look through my CDs, find Stone Temple Pilots to play. And half way through that song, the phone rings again. I pick it up. You have a collect call from - thank you, dude - at Porter County Jail.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Excellent. Matt Hoskins, you just received your MA in English literature, researching video game narratives.

MATT HOSKINS: That's correct. I like to refer to it a little more pretentiously.

EISENBERG: Really?

HOSKINS: Yeah, I just got my Master's degree in English literature studying nontraditional narrative structures, via a post-human lens.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yeah, well, you tell that to the customers at Kinko's.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I love it. Where do you want to do next?

HOSKINS: Well, I'm currently just working retail. But I...

(LAUGHTER)

HOSKINS: I would eventually like to go on and get my Ph.D. and eventually write a novel, so...

EISENBERG: Excellent. OK, yeah, good. Well, this next game is about video games, so one of you has an edge.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: But it's also a music game that John will enjoy. But let's go over to Jonathan Coulton.

JONATHAN COULTON: Yes, thank you, Ophira. This game is called Moves Like Frogger.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I apologize in advance. We took Maroon 5 song, "Moves Like Jagger" and rewrote it to be about video games. So just buzz in to tell me what game I'm singing about, and the winner will move on to the final round at the end of the show. Jon, you're going to like this a lot. You ready?

(Singing) Just shoot for the stars when you spot them. The aliens march toward the bottom. Your lasers the way to keep them at bay so enter the fray.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John?

ROBINSON: "Space Invaders."

COULTON: Yeah, you got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: (Singing) Every piece is made of four blocks. Hurry, 'cause they're dropping like rocks. You've got to move those pieces, you've got to move those pieces, you've got to move those pieces. Every time you make a new line, buy yourself a little more time. You've got to move those pieces, you've got to move those pieces, you've got to move those pieces.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Matt?

HOSKINS: "Tetris."

COULTON: "Tetris" is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: (Singing) A wide-open space you can build in. A dangerous place to get killed in, a Pandora's box of digging for rocks and breaking up blocks. You trade with the guy who's a native. You only can fly in creative, so you choose the mode, you reap what you sewed when creepers explode.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Matt?

HOSKINS: "Minecraft?"

COULTON: "Minecraft" is the answer.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I admitted before the show, I've never played "Minecraft." And I just found out that it's my - I thought it was mind craft, where you just thought of crafts in your mind or something. I don't know.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: You would like...

COULTON: (Laughter) That's a great game.

EISENBERG: You embroider.

COULTON: Just think about it...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: If you want to make it, just think about it and you can make it in your mind.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I'm just decoupaging right now.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: (Singing) Up, down, left, right, got to match up three. There's Tiffi and there's Mr. Toffee. Got to match confections, you move in all directions. You're making sweet connection.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John?

ROBINSON: "Candy Crush?"

COULTON: "Candy Crush," that's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: John, do you play "Candy Crush?"

ROBINSON: Actually, I don't.

EISENBERG: Have you ever played it?

ROBINSON: Once.

EISENBERG: Once? And then you stopped?

ROBINSON: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Wow.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Matt?

HOSKINS: I think it's a requirement of working in retail that you play "Candy Crush," so...

EISENBERG: (Laughter) How many...

HOSKINS: What else are you going to do with your time?

COULTON: That's right, that's what they say. If you have time to lean, you have time to play "Candy Crush."

HOSKINS: Exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: This is your last clue. (Singing) Crosswords with a friend in Montpellier. Though it looks a little familiar, it's not from Scrabble. It's a lot like Scrabble. It's a lot like Scrabble.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: (Singing) Letter tiles, you know the objective. Really from a legal perspective, it's a lot like Scrabble. But it's not quite Scrabble. No, it definitely doesn't infringe on Scrabble.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: John?

ROBINSON: "Words With Friends."

COULTON: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

ART CHUNG: They both did great. But, John, you're moving like Jagger to the final round at the end of the show.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EMOTIONAL RESCUE")

THE ROLLING STONES: (Singing) Over you.

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