'Morning Edition' Listeners Get Creative With Show's Theme David Greene and Renee Montagne share more covers and remixes of the Morning Edition theme produced by listeners. We'll hear bluegrass, reggae and electronic versions of the theme.

'Morning Edition' Listeners Get Creative With Show's Theme

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, so last month we put out a call to you, our listeners. And we asked you an odd question. We asked you to produce your own versions of the MORNING EDITION theme music. Last week, we brought you some of the themes we received. Today we have another equally diverse playlist for you.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We'll begin with a work by bluegrass musician Charles Butler of Nashville, Tenn. He sent us this rendition of the theme he performed on the banjo.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE MORNING EDITION THEME" PERFORMED BY CHARLES BUTLER)

GREENE: Well, that's quite lovely. Let's hear next from Aidan Akenson from Portland, Ore. He performs under the name FPS, and he makes electronic music. He sent us this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE MORNING EDITION THEME" PERFORMED BY FPS

MONTAGNE: Finally, a Baltimore-based funk band called The Shamus Effect created a reggae rendition of the theme.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE MORNING EDITION THEME" PERFORMED BY THE SHAMUS EFFECT)

MONTAGNE: And those are just a sampling of the many submissions we have received. But look, we're still happy to get more.

GREENE: We are. We're kind of getting addicted to this. Upload your versions to SoundCloud with the hashtag #morningeditiontheme. And then fill out the form on our website. It's at morningeditiontheme.npr.org.

MONTAGNE: And we'll play the ones we like on this program in the coming days and weeks.

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