Letters: 'Charlie,' Dog-Breeding, 'Loch Lomond' We hear from some of our listeners about our segments on Charlie and the Chcolate Factory, dog-breeding and "Loch Lomond."
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Letters: 'Charlie,' Dog-Breeding, 'Loch Lomond'

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Letters: 'Charlie,' Dog-Breeding, 'Loch Lomond'

Letters: 'Charlie,' Dog-Breeding, 'Loch Lomond'

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  • Transcript

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters, and we begin with a correction.

Simon Dasher(ph) wrote to say: `In our segment on "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" two weeks ago, we identified the man who played the oompa-loompas as Roy Deep. We got it backward. His name is Deep Roy.

A number of you wrote to say you enjoyed the essay by Tim Brooks on dog breeding chic. One person, though, had a problem with Tim's statement that Martha Stewart's dog looked like a black fungus. `It is OK for me to call French bulldogs heinous little funguses, fungi, whatever, but it was a big ouch to hear it on NPR,' writes Kathy Denalvilsack(ph) of Pinewood, Minnesota. `You see, I actually bred the little Frenchie that Martha Stewart owns and can promise you that she is a lovable, dear little gremlin. It is not my place to defend pure-bred dogs, but I have tried to live my life as free of judging others as I can. So don't pick on my puppies, Tim.'

Many of you also wrote in to say you were touched by our What's In a Song? segment on the story behind the folk ballad, "Loch Lomond." As we said in the introduction, there are a number of different interpretations of the lyrics, and a few of you wrote to tell us some of the other stories. `The most common interpretation,' writes Lawrence Crumb, of Eugene, Oregon, `is that two of Bonnie Prince Charlie's men were captured and left behind in Carlisle after the failed rising of 1745. One of the young soldiers was to be executed, the other released. The spirit of the dead soldier, traveling by the low road, would reach Scotland before his comrade who would be struggling along the actual road over high, rugged country.'

Write to us. Just go to npr.org and click on the `contact us' link.

(Soundbite from "Loch Lomond")

Unidentified Man: (Singing) ...on the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

HANSEN: You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

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