Manhattanhenge Brightens This Memorial Day Weekend Manhattanhenge is the name for the solar phenomena that occurs this weekend in New York City when the setting sun perfectly aligns with the numbered streets running east and west on the city's grid.
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Manhattanhenge Brightens This Memorial Day Weekend

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Manhattanhenge Brightens This Memorial Day Weekend

Manhattanhenge Brightens This Memorial Day Weekend

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There's a little something special to celebrate this Memorial Day weekend if you happen to be in New York City. Manhattanhenge, it's called. For two days, twice a year, on either side of the summer solstice, the setting sun perfectly aligns with the city's numbered streets. Those blocks, running east to west on Manhattan's grid, form a corridor, inducing a sunset that bathes the buildings in warm, amber light.

One astrophysicist told The New York Times the phenomenon has a lot to do with how the city was constructed two centuries ago. Jackie Faherty says, in the 1800s, when they made these 90 degree angles, they created a bullseye for the sun to hit. And you may have a henge in your town, too. Chicago, Philly, Boston, Toronto and Montreal all produce henges when the timing is right.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STONEHENGE")

SPINAL TAP: (Singing) Stonehenge, where the demons dwell, where the banshees live and they do live well. Stonehenge, where a man's a man and the children dance to the pipes of Pan.

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