Sunday Puzzle: Welcome To An Affair Of Phrases, Each Entwined By A Tiny 'Of' Every answer this week consists of two familiar phrases in the form "___ of ___." In each case, the first word of the two phrases is the same. We offer the ending words; you tell us the full phrases.
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Welcome To An Affair Of Phrases, Each Entwined By A Tiny 'Of'

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Welcome To An Affair Of Phrases, Each Entwined By A Tiny 'Of'

Welcome To An Affair Of Phrases, Each Entwined By A Tiny 'Of'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483521883/483587915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

You saw what happened when Britain voted to leave the EU, so remain where you are because it's time for the Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: And I'm joined by the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Good morning, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: So, Will, is it true what I hear that you have branched out to ESPN Sports Center, talking about table tennis?

SHORTZ: They're doing a feature story on this 19-year-old, a table tennis phenomenon. And I think it's going to include a bit of me taping an NPR Puzzle last month...

WERTHEIMER: Well, that'll be good.

SHORTZ: ...So that should be interesting. Yeah.

WERTHEIMER: (Laughter) Could you remind us of last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Mark Isaak of Sunnyvale, Calif. And the challenge was to think of a word that means unfinished. I said add one letter at the start and one letter at the end to get a new word that means the opposite of the first. What words are these? Well, the answer is rough to wrought - W-R-O-U-G-H-T. And wrought iron is worked iron, which is finished iron, just the opposite of rough.

A number of solvers sent in raw and drawn. Thought that was close but it was hard for me to see how drawn equaled finished, so we just stuck with rough and wrought.

WERTHEIMER: We receive just 387 correct answers this week. Our randomly selected winner is Keith Clay of Kent, Wash. Congratulations, Keith.

KEITH CLAY: Thank you very much.

WERTHEIMER: How did you get to the answer?

CLAY: Well, I thought about it for a fair amount on the first day, on Sunday, and just nothing came to me. And actually I was just walking along on Monday and the word wrought popped into my head.

SHORTZ: (Laughter).

CLAY: And I said, I'll bet that's what - I'll bet that's what Will Shortz meant, is rough and wrought. So here I am.

WERTHEIMER: Have you been playing the Puzzle a long time?

CLAY: Since before there was email.

WERTHEIMER: (Laughter) So you've heard a lot of these and you've never won before?

CLAY: Never.

WERTHEIMER: Well, we hope all those years of listening will help you out today.

SHORTZ: All right, Keith and Linda, every answer today consists of two familiar phrases in the form blank of blank, as in change of heart and change of pace. And in each case, the first word of the two phrases is the same. I'll give you the ending words. You tell me the full phrases. For example, if I said heart and pace, you would say change of heart and change of pace. Number one is cards and representatives.

CLAY: House.

SHORTZ: House of cards, House of Representatives. Good. Number two is thumb - T-H-U-M-B - thumb and law.

CLAY: Rule.

SHORTZ: Rule of thumb, rule of law. Good. View - V-I-E-W - and order.

CLAY: Point.

SHORTZ: Point of view, point of order. Fare - F-A-R-E - and rights - R-I-G-H-T-S.

CLAY: That would be bill.

SHORTZ: Bill of fair, bill of rights. Fire - F-I-R-E - and wax.

CLAY: House? Fire. Fire, wax.

SHORTZ: If you were just doing great on this puzzle, or anything, you would be a...

CLAY: House of fire?

SHORTZ: No.

WERTHEIMER: Well, house of fire, house of wax. I mean, now those are...

SHORTZ: There is that old movie, "House Of Wax," that 3-D movie, wasn't it, with Vincent Price?

WERTHEIMER: Yes, yes.

SHORTZ: OK, I'll give that to you. I was going for ball, as in ball of fire, ball of wax. Try this one. Steel - S-T-E-E-L - and war - W-A-R.

CLAY: Man of steel, man of war.

SHORTZ: That's it. Arms and mail - M-A-I-L.

CLAY: Coat?

SHORTZ: Yes, coat of arms, coat of mail. Africa, plenty.

CLAY: Horn - H-O-R-N.

SHORTZ: That's it. Golf, drinks.

CLAY: Round.

SHORTZ: Round of golf, round of drinks. Stairs - S-T-A-I-R-S - and fancy.

CLAY: Fancy.

SHORTZ: Blank of fancy.

CLAY: Flight - flight of stairs.

SHORTZ: That's it. And your last one is chance - C-H-A-N-C-E - chance and thrones.

CLAY: Game of.

SHORTZ: That is it. Good job.

WERTHEIMER: (Laughter) Better than a good job, a great job, Keith. You are really fast with this stuff.

CLAY: Well, thank you.

WERTHEIMER: Thanks for playing our puzzle today. You will get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. Keith, what is your public radio station?

CLAY: I am a member of both KUOW in Seattle and now independently owned KPLU in Tacoma.

WERTHEIMER: Keith Clay of Kent, Wash., thank you so much.

CLAY: Thank you. It's been a pleasure.

WERTHEIMER: So, Will, what is the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Peter Collins of Ann Arbor, Mich. Think of two well-known American cities, each five letters long. The first two letters of the first city are the state postal abbreviation of the second city. And the first two letters of the second city are the state postal abbreviation of the first city. What cities are these?

So again, two well-known American cities, each five letters long. The first two letters of the first city are the state postal abbreviation of the second one and the first two letters of the second city are the state postal abbreviation of the first one. What two cities are these?

WERTHEIMER: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle. Click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person please. And our deadline for entries is Wednesday, June 29, at 3 p.m. Eastern. That's a full day earlier than usual, so please take note and be sure to get your entries in on time.

Again, our deadline for entries this week is Wednesday, June 29, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Please include a telephone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you are the winner, we'll give you a call and you will get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Linda.

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