Letters: Big-City Bravery; Stroke Survivor; Classy Music Sheilah Kast reads some letters from our listeners. Topics include keeping the faith in New York in the face of the terrorist threat; a stroke survivor's moving message; and the value of classical music.
NPR logo

Letters: Big-City Bravery; Stroke Survivor; Classy Music

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4853298/4853299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Letters: Big-City Bravery; Stroke Survivor; Classy Music

Letters: Big-City Bravery; Stroke Survivor; Classy Music

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4853298/4853299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SHEILAH KAST, host:

Time now for your letters.

Our piece last week about the man who turned his truck into a rolling September 11th memorial prompted this letter from Joanne Devani(ph) of Brooklyn, New York: `I am totally offended by the final statement of the piece in which the person interviewed said that people in small towns better remember September 11th and that folks in big cities forget more easily and have forgotten. These comments showed just how much most of America still has no understanding of what it was like to be in New York on September 11th and what it takes to continue living in New York. We live here with the daily threat of imminent terrorism. Every time another city experiences an act of terror, we wonder when it will happen here again. We have our bags searched on our daily commute to work. Continuing to live in New York is a daily act of bravery unlauded and totally unappreciated by those like the man interviewed in that piece from the small town in the Midwest. To him and others who share his views, I can only say, "Walk a mile in our big-city shoes."'

Many of you wrote to say how moved you were by the essay from stroke survivor Margaret Tretbar. Once an avid reader, she now has great difficulty reading, particularly remembering what she has just read. Dianne Nagle(ph) of Butler, Maryland, wrote: `Please, let Margaret know that while I cannot restore her ability to read, I will read a novel every week in her name. Did she do the actual recording we heard on the radio? Her composition was wonderful and she should write, and I will gladly read.' That was indeed Ms. Tretbar reading her own words. Many of you wrote in with suggestions for audiobooks, prayers and offers for support. They've all been forwarded to Ms. Tretbar.

One note. We said Ms. Tretbar lives in St. Louis. Our apologies; she lives in Kansas City, Missouri.

Finally, a note from Jackson Parkhurst(ph) of Brevard, North Carolina: `I wrote a couple of weeks ago complaining about the overwhelmingly amount of awful pop music on WEEKEND EDITION SUNDAY,' he writes. `I'm now writing to thank you for a great story last week on the plight of the New Orleans Opera and the really fine story on Thomas Tallis. It brought tears to my eyes. That's more like it.'

You can write us. Just go to our Web site at npr.org and click on the `Contact us' link. And while you're there, why don't you click on the `NPR podcast link, as well? You'll be able to get NPR's most e-mailed stories as a downloadable file delivered to your computer or MP3 audio player every week.

(Soundbite of music)

Unidentified Choir: (Singing in foreign language)

KAST: It's 22 minutes before the hour.

Copyright © 2005 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.