Scientists Attribute Diego With Giving His Species A Future The tortoise is more than 100 years old and lives in the Galapagos Islands. Diego's species was almost extinct until scientists say he got busy. He now has 800 offspring.
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Scientists Attribute Diego With Giving His Species A Future

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Scientists Attribute Diego With Giving His Species A Future

Scientists Attribute Diego With Giving His Species A Future

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Here's what you should know about Diego. He's more than 100 years old. He lives in the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador, and he's part of a rare species of tortoise that was nearly extinct until he got involved. Scientists describe Diego as very sexually active. He has 800 offspring and has played a significant role in giving his species a future. Here's one thing I'm quite sure of. Making any kind of joke here is only going to get me in trouble. So I'll leave it with that. It's MORNING EDITION.

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