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Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

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Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

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  • Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Jazz, classical, punk, hip-hop, swing, R&B - you name it, public radio plays it. This week, we checked in with DJs to tell us about the songs that are getting heavy rotation.

ELENA SEE: Hey, I'm Elena See from Folk Alley. And this month, we picked a song from Amanda Shires.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE WAY IT DIMMED")

AMANDA SHIRES: (Singing) This is how I think about you...

SEE: The song's called "The Way It Dimmed" from her brand-new record "My Piece Of Land." And my goodness, the images she creates are so vivid.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE WAY IT DIMMED")

SHIRES: (Singing) Your hands laced in my belt loops, I remember the fire...

SEE: Think about it, the parade of images I never finished sorting through, your hands laced in my belt loops. Whoo (ph), even if that hasn't happened to you, I bet you can imagine it. Or you've got something kind of similar to it.

It's a great song and it resonates, I think, with people who listen to it because we're all in that position, or have been, where we're thinking back - a mixture of regret, fondness. Maybe we shouldn't have left that relationship, but we did. Maybe we'll never think of it again. Or maybe we'll come back to this point and keep thinking about it.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE WAY IT DIMMED")

SHIRES: (Singing) Your fingerprints are still burned into my skin, and I remember the fire and the way it dimmed, as a fire will sometimes do.

JERAD WALKER: My name is Jerad Walker. I'm the music director at opbmusic, which is the music service of Oregon Public Broadcasting. And my pick is the song "Needle Doll" by the band The Minders.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NEEDLE DOLL")

THE MINDERS: (Singing) I've been deceived by a secret power you can't believe at all (ph).

WALKER: They haven't released an album in over a decade. So when it was announced earlier this year that there was new material in the pipeline, people in Portland, Ore., which is their hometown, got very excited. The band's lead singer, Martyn Leaper, he's got a voice that cuts through everything like a knife. And it highlights the lyrics, which are really funny but also very (laughter) - they're visceral.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NEEDLE DOLL")

THE MINDERS: (Singing) Keep on scheming, I will find a (unintelligible) (ph).

WALKER: It's a breakup song. The song's filled with military metaphors and a lot of accusations of snootiness. And it actually calls for the use of black magic on an ex.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "NEEDLE DOLL")

THE MINDERS: (Singing) I can't believe you're nervous (unintelligible). It's like a disease (ph).

WALKER: Never break up with Martyn Leaper, America. But it's also a fun song. I mean, there's all kinds of crunchy guitars and handclaps, and it's just catchy, a surprising return from a band that took a long hiatus.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE I COME")

IZO FITZROY: (Singing) (Unintelligible) when I was little child, I was founded by the world outside (ph).

CHRIS CAMPBELL: All right, my name is Chris Campbell. And I'm host of The Progressive Underground as heard on 101.9 WDET here in Detroit. And my pick for this month is Izo FitzRoy and the name of the tune is called "Here I Come: The Moods Remix."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE I COME")

FITZROY: (Singing) But there I am in a bubble, tiptoe on the fence, waving my arms, rolling my eyes, dancing with pretense...

CAMPBELL: Clubs here in the Detroit area have been bumping this tune heavily as well. And it sounds great over a - just a gigantic surround sound system. It evokes shades of Jamiroquai, Brand New Heavies - some of that dance music and acid jazz from the early '90s. It's really funky and every time I've seen it played here in the clubs - full dance floor.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE I COME")

FITZROY: (Singing) It's such a funny thing, this weight up on our spines, breaking backs and breaking hearts, corrupting youthful minds.

CAMPBELL: Izo FitzRoy's vocals - they're powerhouse. And it signals, in my opinion, Izo FitzRoy as being one of the top soul music and dance music singers to come on the scene in years. So we're going to hear a lot from her in the near future.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE I COME")

FITZROY: (Singing) Here I come, oh, I'm wild and free. I'm going to shake it loose. I'm gonna shudder and scream. No more silence and no more grey. I'm moving forward (ph)...

SIMON: You can hear more music in heavy rotation that's on our website, nprmusic.org. This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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