Protesters Renew Calls To Release Police Video Of Charlotte, N.C. Shooting In Charlotte, N.C., there are renewed calls to release video that shows Tuesday's fatal shooting of a black man by police. The family of Keith Lamont Scott saw it for the first time and asked for it be shown publicly.
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Protesters Renew Calls To Release Police Video Of Charlotte, N.C. Shooting

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Protesters Renew Calls To Release Police Video Of Charlotte, N.C. Shooting

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Protesters Renew Calls To Release Police Video Of Charlotte, N.C. Shooting

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A new video is out today of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. He's the African-American man who was killed this week in Charlotte. Scott had been waiting for his son to come on a school bus when police confronted him. They were responding to an arrest warrant for another man. Police say Scott had a gun and was a threat to officers. Scott's family says he didn't own a gun. I should say some of what you're about to hear might be disturbing, especially in the first minute and a half. Here's NPR's Greg Allen from Charlotte.

GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: For days, ever since Tuesday when an officer shot and killed Scott, authorities in Charlotte have resisted pressure for them to release two videos police recorded of the shooting. Charlotte's police chief hasn't so far, saying it could damage the investigation.

Now this new cell phone video of the shooting recorded by Scott's wife increases the pressure on police. The shaky, handheld recording was released by the family to several media organizations, including NPR. Rakeyia Scott is heard calling out to officers who were approaching her husband's truck with their guns drawn.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

RAKEYIA SCOTT: Don't shoot him. Don't shoot him. He has no weapon. He has no weapon. Don't shoot him.

ALLEN: While Scott is still in the vehicle, police are heard repeatedly yelling, drop the gun.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SCOTT: He doesn't have a gun. He has a TBI. He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine.

UNIDENTIFIED OFFICER: Drop the gun.

ALLEN: A TBI is a traumatic brain injury. Scott's family says a motorcycle accident last year left him with a brain injury for which he took medication. Police call for a metal baton, and they appear to break the window of Scott's vehicle. As he gets out of his truck, his wife calls out to him. But it's unclear exactly what's going on when the gunfire happens.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SCOTT: Keith, Keith, don't you do it. Don't you do it. Keith, Keith, Keith, don't you do it. Did you shoot him? Did you shoot him?

ALLEN: The video provides new information about what happens after Scott has been shot and is on the ground. Officers are seen bending over his body and dropping what appear to be latex gloves. There's no clear sign of a gun on the ground near Scott's feet. That's contrary to a photo that's been circulated showing an object near Scott's feet many have believed was a gun.

On MSNBC, the lawyer for Scott's family, Justin Bamberg, said the family wants the city to release its videos of the shooting. Bamberg has seen those videos and says they're inconclusive. Like those, Bamberg says this new recording doesn't show what, if anything, Scott had in his hand when he was shot.

JUSTIN BAMBERG: What you do see is that at some point there are what appears to be multiple objects on the ground, but of course you can't make out what they are. So at this point, nothing in this video affects whether or not out their allegation that they found a gun, whether there was a gun or not.

ALLEN: Bamberg says he's given a copy of the family's video to the police. So far neither the mayor nor the police chief have responded. At a briefing earlier today, Chief Kerr Putney was adamant that police would not release its videos to the public for now despite a growing call by citizens, the news media and some elected officials.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

CHIEF KERR PUTNEY: My job is to make sure I don't do more damage, more harm and, to be quite frank, fracture the trust that we've been trying to build here. And to do that just because of what's going on in social media is counterproductive.

ALLEN: North Carolina's State Bureau of Investigation now has taken charge of the investigation into Scott's shooting. Putney said he was pleased that last night's demonstration in Charlotte was more peaceful than earlier ones. There were just a few arrests and no major injuries of police or protesters.

Police today announced they'd arrested a man they believe shot and killed one of the protesters Wednesday night, Justin Carr. Putney says video from surveillance cameras led to the arrest.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PUTNEY: And our crime scene investigators and our homicide detectives were able to use a lot of footage. Our real-time crime center was able to supply footage from cameras that helped us solve that case.

ALLEN: Of midnight, the 6 a.m. curfew continues in Charlotte. The NFL says the Carolina Panthers will play a home game in their stadium near the city center on Sunday as scheduled. City leaders say Charlotte is open for business and is working to return to normal hours. Greg Allen, NPR News, Charlotte.

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