'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation : The Salt Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries — with culturally specific adaptations. The U.S., for instance, gets shorter noodles, because Americans don't slurp them up like the Japanese.
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'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

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'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495807462/495882795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's take a moment now to honor an item that is much loved by those of us working overnights here at MORNING EDITION. We're talking Cup Noodles, instant ramen, one of Japan's most famous inventions consumed by billions around the globe. It turned 45 years old this month. NPR's Elise Hu has our celebration.

ELISE HU, BYLINE: There's no better place to get into the Cup Noodle spirit than its very own museum in Yokohama, Japan. Noodle museum manager Yuya Ichikawa leads us on a tour.

YUYA ICHIKAWA: (Through interpreter) So this is the museum that really honors the creator of instant ramen and Cup Noodles.

HU: In it, a floor-to-ceiling display of every flavor of instant ramen put out since the mid-20th century, a kitchen to make fresh ramen noodles, a sprawling assembly line to create your own Cup Noodles concoction.

I'm just going to go with the original flavor, then pork.

And, of course, this place is filled with tributes to the Cup Noodles creator, a man named Momofuku Ando. He first came up with instant ramen noodles while working in a backyard shed in 1958. Before then, ramen noodles couldn't be stored or cooked quickly, only bought fresh and served after a long boil. Ando had to figure out how to take cooked noodles, dry them out to preserve them so they could cook almost instantly later. Ichikawa explains.

ICHIKAWA: (Through interpreter) He tried many, many methods of drying the ramen. But he could never find anything that worked perfectly well. And then one day, he was watching his wife make tempura.

HU: Which are battered and deep-fried foods.

ICHIKAWA: And he realized this is how it can be done.

HU: Fried and dried. But what really took off was the twist on Ando's original invention, packaging his instant noodles in a cup. Ando was inspired to do that after a trip to the United States, when he saw Americans breaking his rectangular blocks of ramen into cups. He released Cup Noodles 45 years ago in September 1971. And all these years later, the creation is still hugely popular. So many crowds fill the Cup Noodles Museum, it's hard to turn around without colliding into a devotee like Canadian Kayla Whitehead.

HU: So how devoted to instant ramen noodles are you?

KAYLA WHITEHEAD: We're university students, so quite devoted (laughter). And I don't really get too creative - just the sauce packet and the water. It's all I do (laughter) - all about ease of use.

HU: Noodle manufacturer Nissin Foods counts 97 billion packages of instant ramen sold globally last year. And Cup Noodles is now available in more than 80 countries. Since the product has gone so global, Nissin makes culturally specific adaptations. For example, in Asia, loudly slurping your noodles is considered a compliment to the chef. But Nissin's Ichikawa knows...

ICHIKAWA: (Through interpreter) Americans don't like to slurp their noodles. So they make the length of the noodles for the American versions smaller, so they don't have to suck it up.

HU: Cup Noodles' popularity is without question. But sodium loaded and lightly fried, this stuff isn't exactly the healthiest. Even the Cup Noodles Museum manager recommends more balance in your diet. But before we leave, he mentions a little trivia.

ICHIKAWA: (Through interpreter) The founder of our company, he ate chicken ramen every day of his life.

HU: And he lived to a pretty long time, right?

ICHIKAWA: (Speaking Japanese).

HU: On that one cup noodles a day diet, Momofuku Ando lived to be 96.

Elise Hu, NPR News, Yokohama, Japan.

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