Letters: U.S. and China, Nasal Irrigation Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep read from listener letters. Many listeners had comments about our series on U.S.-Chinese relations and our report on nasal irrigation.
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Letters: U.S. and China, Nasal Irrigation

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Letters: U.S. and China, Nasal Irrigation

Letters: U.S. and China, Nasal Irrigation

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

This week's series on US-Chinese relations inspired many of you to write us. Some of those letters begin our regular Thursday selection of your comments. David Henderson of Galloway, Ohio, writes, `I recently visited China and found a central theme throughout my tour. The United States has shown China how to do things better.'

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

David Henderson continues, `The US was once an industrial nation. Now we are service oriented, and China is an industrial nation. We have adjusted the value of our dollar in the past, and China is doing the same thing today. Everything they're doing,' he writes, `we've done in the past, but we cry foul.'

INSKEEP: Arthur Thorne(ph) of Northampton, Virginia, adds, `I was surprised by the alarmist reactions to China's military buildup in some of your interviews. Given China's history of being exploited by the West and Japan and its growing need for resources, is it any wonder,' he asks, `that its objectives should be any different from those of the American military? That is, to keep its shores safe and to project power beyond its borders.'

MONTAGNE: Last week we reported on a well-known retreat for artists in Peterborough, New Hampshire. The MacDowell Colony is tax-exempt, but the town is now asking it to pay some tax to help pay for services. That inspired former MacDowell Fellow Sasha Waters to remind us, quote, "Residents of New Hampshire pay no income tax. This is a choice that saddles property owners with the burden of state and local services.' Sasha Waters now teaches film at the University of Iowa. A town may need money, but in her opinion, artists, even visiting ones like MacDowell's, shouldn't have to pony up.

Ms. SASHA WATERS (Former Fellow, MacDowell Colony): For anyone to suggest that an arts organization should not be able to retain its nonprofit status is very frightening. It's not just about the MacDowell Colony to me. It's about community theater groups and film festivals across the country. You know, what kind of message will this send to them? It puts every arts organization at risk.

INSKEEP: Now finally this morning, who knew that so many of you suffer from chronically stuffed noses? We learned this after airing a report about nasal irrigation, which one listener described as a fascinating, if slightly gross, story. We reported that you can fight colds and congestion by squeezing saline solution into your nose and you can do this, if you must, with syringes or even small machines. A surprising number of you complained that we failed to mention an easy and ancient technique that is used in yoga, the neti pot, as described by Mark O'Neill(ph) of North Little Rock, Arkansas. It's a simple device, like a small teapot which one fills with saline and inserts the tapered tip into the--you can imagine the rest. O'Neill says this method for nasal irrigation is effective and painless and, quote, "is used by practitioners of preventative health as regularly as we use our toothbrushes."

MONTAGNE: And of course, we welcome all of your remedies, ancient, gross and otherwise, as well as your comments. To send us an e-mail, visit npr.org and click on `Contact us.'

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