In 'The Tao Of Bill Murray,' A Lesson On Joy And Spontaneity : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture A new book reminds me why the actor has been my comedy hero ever since he started on Saturday Night Live when I was just a wisecracking high school student, says Adam Frank.
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In 'The Tao Of Bill Murray,' A Lesson On Joy And Spontaneity

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In 'The Tao Of Bill Murray,' A Lesson On Joy And Spontaneity

In 'The Tao Of Bill Murray,' A Lesson On Joy And Spontaneity

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Celebrities are just like us, except that they're not. And some of them really like to mess with us. Gavin Edwards has written a book about this, about the antics of one particular celebrity. It's called "The Tao Of Bill Murray: Real-Life Stories Of Joy, Enlightenment And Party Crashing." Our NPR blogger and physicist philosopher Adam Frank has a review.

ADAM FRANK, BYLINE: Imagine standing on a corner in New York City. Suddenly, someone puts their hand over your eyes like when you were a little kid. Then a strangely familiar voice says, guess who? The stranger pulls his arms back, and you turn around to see Bill Murray smiling at you. He whispers in your ear, no one will ever believe you and then disappears into the passing river of pedestrians.

These are the kind of stories that fill Gavin Edwards' new book, stories like Bill Murray showing up unexpectedly at a house party of 20-somethings where he helps organize the booze, expounds on the pleasures of sweet potato casserole and dances with guests until he slips out the door. Now, with so many Bill Murray stories out there, I was thankful for Edwards' ability to arrange them into the 10 principles of Bill, principles like invite yourself to the party or drop coin on the world.

You see, for Edwards, there are common themes in Bill behavior. And they're important because he thinks something more is going on here than just another celebrity exhibiting a particularly wacky form of celebrity behavior. That's why from early on in the book, Edwards seems to be asking us - do you think Bill is trying to tell us something? After reading the book, I'm pretty sure the answer is yes, Bill Murray is trying to tell us something.

"The Tao Of Bill Murray" reminds me of why he's been my comedy hero since he started on "Saturday Night Live" and I was just a wisecracking high school student. You see, Bill Murray in those days was like a live-action Bugs Bunny, finessing his way through tight situations with boundless confidence, totally unfazed by the trouble around him. In movies like "Meatballs," "Caddyshack" and "Stripes," he was my man.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "STRIPES")

BILL MURRAY: (As John) We're Americans with a capital A, huh? You know what that means? Do you? That means that our forefathers were kicked out of every decent country in the world.

FRANK: Then came "Groundhog Day" in 1993 in which something new stepped into Murray's sideways approach to the world - tenderness.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GROUNDHOG DAY")

MURRAY: (As Phil) No matter what happens tomorrow or for the rest of my life, I'm happy now because I love you.

FRANK: Bill Murray's quiet performances in "Rushmore" and "Lost In Translation" made it clear he'd learned something about life. We watched him grow past being just a wiseass until he became wise. Edwards shows us how Murray uses his star power to bring surprise and delight into random people's lives. Whether it's showing up uninvited to a kickball game or stopping into a bachelor party to give unsolicited advice on love and marriage, it does seem that Bill Murray is trying to tell us something essential about joy and spontaneity, so I think it's high time we all listen to Bill. And hey, Mr. Murray, I'm thinking about having a party next week at my house. I'll be waiting. Bill?

MCEVERS: That is NPR blogger, astrophysicist and Bill Murray fan Adam Frank.

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