Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: Special Agent-in-Charge Federal Air Marshals Service James Bauer; Lee Hamilton, co-chair of the 9-11 Commission; Richard Falkenrath, former White House deputy Homeland Security adviser; U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales; Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT); U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice; President George W. Bush.
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. JAMES BAUER (Federal Air Marshals Service): At some point he uttered threatening words that included a sentence to the effect that he had a bomb. There were federal air marshals on board the aircraft. They came out of their cover, confronted him and he remained non-compliant with their instructions. As he was attempting to evade them, his actions caused the FAMs to fire shots and, in fact, he is deceased.

Mr. RICHARD FALKENRATH (Former White House Deputy Homeland Security Adviser): The commission really should be proud of the extent to which the administration embraced their recommendations from July of last year. But I question their ability, in their new incarnation, to gauge objectively how the federal government is doing.

Mr. LEE HAMILTON (Co-chair, 9-11 Commission): Disasters, whether natural or manmade, happen in localities. They happen in states. Their officials need the best information the federal government can provide, and right now they're not getting it.

Mr. ALBERTO GONZALES (Attorney General): We've had the Patriot Act for four years. People have seen how the Department of Justice has been very responsible in exercising authorities under the Patriot Act. And for that reason, we've suggested that a sunset would not be appropriate.

Senator PATRICK LEAHY (Democrat, Vermont): You commission these letters and then go after anybody's records. You can go into their--investigate them. You can bring a business to a complete halt by doing it. And if you have the wrong person, they have no way of even being able to question this in court.

Secretary CONDOLEEZZA RICE (State Department): The United States does not permit, tolerate or condone torture under any circumstances. Moreover, in accordance with the policy of this administration, the United States has respected and will continue to respect the sovereignty of other countries.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: In the past, al-Qaeda has said that American pullouts from Lebanon and Somalia showed them that America was weak and could be made to run. And now the terrorists think they can make America run in Iraq, and that is not going to happen so long as I'm the commander in chief.

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