Short Notes on John Henry Faulk and Oscar Brand This year, John Henry Faulk's Christmas story won't be broadcast on air, but it is available as an MP3 download on npr.org. And folksinger Oscar Brand, host of public radio's "Folksong Festival," celebrates 60 years on the radio.
NPR logo

Short Notes on John Henry Faulk and Oscar Brand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5048112/5048113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Short Notes on John Henry Faulk and Oscar Brand

Short Notes on John Henry Faulk and Oscar Brand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5048112/5048113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Now a couple of short notes to pass along. Lately, some of you have written to us about John Henry Faulk's Christmas story, the one about the little boy with the orange. We're not broadcasting it this year, but it is available at our Web site. It can be downloaded as an MP3 file. You can put it on your iPod, burn a CD, and play it whenever you want. Just go to our Web site, npr.org, and click on the `holidays' link.

Also, an old friend of this program marked a radio milestone this weekend. Last night, folk singer Oscar Brand celebrated 60 years on the radio. His show "Folk Song Festival" debuted on WNYC in New York City on December 10th, 1945. His first guest was Pete Seeger, and every week since then, Oscar Brand has played host to a roster of folk musicians from Woody Guthrie to his son Arlo, Leadbelly, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Richie Havens, Judy Collins, Harry Chapin, Emmylou Harris--the list is too long to go on. "Folk Song festival" is the longest continuously running radio show with a single host. Oscar's achievement will be noted in the next Guinness Book of World Records. And one more thing: He does not get paid for his time as host of "Folk Song Festival." Every week for the past six decades, Oscar has done it for the love of the music.

Copyright © 2005 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.