Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: President Bush; Sen. John McCain (R-AZ); House Judiciary Committee Chairman F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-WI); Sen. John Sununu (R-NH); Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY); Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT).
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: First, I want to congratulate the Iraqi citizens for being courageous and in defying the terrorists and refusing to be cowed into not voting.

Senator JOHN McCAIN (Republican, Arizona): Now we can move forward and make sure that the whole world knows that, as the president has stated many times, that we do not practice cruel, inhuman treatment or torture.

Representative F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER Jr. (Chairman, House Judiciary Committee): The consequence of the Patriot Act expiring on December 31st is going to be putting the American people at greater risk.

Senator JOHN SUNUNU (Republican, New Hampshire): I do not oppose the idea of subpoenaing business records or even library records or the idea of a national security letter. What I oppose is having such powerful government force in place without countervailing protections for civil liberties.

Senator CHARLES SCHUMER (Democrat, New York): Today's revelation that the government listened in on thousands of phone conversations without getting a warrant is shocking and has greatly influenced my vote.

Senator PATRICK LEAHY (Ranking Member, Senate Judiciary Committee): According to the reports, it's being conducted under a secret presidential order based on secret legal opinions by the same Justice Department lawyers; the same ones who argued secretly that the president had ordered the use of torture. Mr. President, it is time to have some checks and balances in this country. We are a democracy.

Pres. BUSH: The NSA's activities under this authorization are thoroughly reviewed by the Justice Department and NSA's top legal officials, including NSA's general counsel and inspector general. Leaders in Congress have been briefed more than a dozen times on this authorization and the activities conducted under it.

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