Iraq's Gas Market Remains Hobbled Gas prices have gone up a 150 percent in Iraq, and for more money there is less gas. Threats by insurgents shut down the country's biggest refinery last month, causing gas lines to stretch for miles in Baghdad. Prices have led to a thriving black market.
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Iraq's Gas Market Remains Hobbled

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Iraq's Gas Market Remains Hobbled

Iraq's Gas Market Remains Hobbled

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And that attack on a fuel convoy north of Baghdad is likely to worsen fuel supply problems in the Iraqi capital. Gas prices have gone up about 150 percent, and for more money there is less gas. Threats by insurgents shut down the country's biggest refinery last month, causing gas lines to stretch for miles in Baghdad. The gas prices have led to a thriving black market for gas. A conservation measure says cars can be on the road only every other day depending on whether they have an odd or even license plate. That rule has led to a brisk trade in counterfeit plates. Iraqis also need gas for private generators, which many rely on for power. Baghdad's power is spotty at best. Currently it's about two hours on and five hours off.

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