Watchdog Opens Probe Into Homeland Security's Handling Of Immigration Order A government watchdog will review the way in which the Department of Homeland Security implemented President Trump's executive order on immigration, including whether the department has followed court orders.
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Watchdog Opens Probe Into Homeland Security's Handling Of Immigration Order

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Watchdog Opens Probe Into Homeland Security's Handling Of Immigration Order

Watchdog Opens Probe Into Homeland Security's Handling Of Immigration Order

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A government watchdog is looking into how the Department of Homeland Security implemented President Trump's controversial immigration order. The department's inspector general announced the investigation last night. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: The inspector general's office says its review comes in response to requests from members of Congress and whistleblower and hotline complaints. The presidential order put in place over the weekend temporarily bans travel from seven Muslim-majority nations and suspends all refugee resettlement. It resulted in chaotic scenes at airports around the country as Customs and Border Patrol officials detained some new arrivals and told others to leave the U.S. Meanwhile, federal judges blocked portions of the president's actions in a number of places. The IG's statement says the office will review Homeland Security's compliance with court orders and allegations of misconduct of DHS personnel. At a news conference earlier this week, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said his department complied with all court orders.

JOHN KELLY: No member of the Homeland Security team ignored a court order, nor would they ignore a court order.

NAYLOR: But not so, says Chris Rickerd of the American Civil Liberties Union.

CHRIS RICKERD: We know of many people who have run into difficulties they should not have - detention, being barred from boarding, being barred at all sorts of junctures where they have a lawful right to come or return to the United States. The ACLU is one of some 50 groups that have filed lawsuits challenging the travel ban. Brian Naylor, NPR News, Washington.

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