Hear Here Every answer in this game are two words or phrases that sound similar but are spelled differently.

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Coming up - pick up the homophone because this word game is calling from inside The Bell House. But first, let's check in with our contestants. Sonny, what's a word you often misuse?

SONNY FARNSWORTH: I don't misuse very many words, but I am always second-guessing myself over phrases like bane of my existence and things like that, trying to make sure I'm getting it accurate.

EISENBERG: Yep. OK. Bane of my existence is a great one right now. Scott, what's a word you often misuse?

SCOTT WOJTANIK: I heavily rely on autocorrect for a lot of stuff, texts and emails. So if I see that red squiggle, I just right click in whatever is the first word that comes up.

(LAUGHTER)

WOJTANIK: So unfortunately, I spell wrong a lot. I type unfortunately a lot.

(LAUGHTER)

WOJTANIK: And there's - it's usually a...

EISENBERG: Your story is consistent.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So every answer in this game are two words or phrases that sound similar but are spelled differently. And our puzzle guru Art Chung is going to give us an example.

PUZZLE GURU ART CHUNG: So if we said, it's the cereal that's kid tested, mother approved and the pumped-up item Foster the People sang about, you'd answer kicks - K-I-X or K-I-C-K-S.

EISENBERG: Sonny, you won the last game, so win this and you'll go to the final round. Scott, you need to win this.

WOJTANIK: I do.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Or something unfortunately will happen to you. Here we go. In this twee movie, Ellen Page is as cold to Michael Cera as a winter's day is in this U.S. state capital.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

WOJTANIK: "Juno."

EISENBERG: "Juno" is correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: The queen of England uses this royal pronoun as her screen name when she plays video games on her gold-plated version of this console.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

WOJTANIK: PSP?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It is incorrect. I'm just wondering, what's PS...

WOJTANIK: The PlayStation...

EISENBERG: PlayStation - oh, portable.

WOJTANIK: Portable.

EISENBERG: PlayStation Portable.

WOJTANIK: She's on the move she's spry (laughter).

JONATHAN COULTON: Yeah, yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Not what we were looking for. Sonny, do you know?

FARNSWORTH: No, I got nothing.

EISENBERG: That's OK. Royal pronoun was the other part of the clue we were looking for - we, as in we or Wii. Yep. I know. She loves her majesty's "Mario Kart."

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Kenny G loves to use his instrument to woo salespeople at this classic Fifth Avenue store.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

WOJTANIK: Saks.

EISENBERG: Saks is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You a Kenny G fan? I'm afraid to say anything about Kenny G because people will really write in.

COULTON: There's a lot of people...

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: A lot of people really like Kenny G.

EISENBERG: Yeah. A book genre targeted towards women and a small square piece of gum targeted toward people of all gender identities.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sonny.

FARNSWORTH: Chiclet.

EISENBERG: Chiclet, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's a hit song for the band Devo, a shaky dog breed and a small container of nitrous oxide.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sonny?

FARNSWORTH: "Whip It."

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Final question - the nickname of the British Broadcasting Corporation and the nickname of the tween idol with more Twitter followers than the population of his native Canada.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Scott.

WOJTANIK: BBC? BB? JB?

(LAUGHTER)

WOJTANIK: Bieber fever.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I do like a nickname that's longer.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I feel like that is the kind of rebel that I think you are, Scott.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: That is not the answer we're looking for. Sonny?

FARNSWORTH: The Beebs? Beebs?

CHUNG: Our judges say yes, so we'll accept Beebs. We're looking for Beeb, but we'll take that.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

CHUNG: It was a close game. Congratulations, Sonny. You've won both games, so you're moving on to the final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Coming up, find out who will face off against Sonny in our final round at the end of the show and grab your guitar and your go bag. Jonathan Coulton has a music parody for the end of days. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and you're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF PWR BTTM SONG "UGLY CHERRIES")

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