The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage : Parallels China produces 520,000 tons of garbage a day. To get rid of it, the government favors burning it, which harms the environment. One answer: sorting garbage and recycling. But that's proved challenging.
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The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage

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The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage

The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Landfills in China are overflowing with trash. In fact, the country's output of garbage is soon expected to surpass that of the U.S. Now China's government says it has a solution. But its plans have some people worried. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports.

ROB SCHMITZ, BYLINE: Sitting inside a cockpit surrounded by glass, two men fiddle with joysticks controlling giant claws outside. They're engineers. The claws they're manipulating are as big as houses. And they're sifting through hundreds of tons of garbage.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINE WHIRRING)

SCHMITZ: They scoop it up and drop it into a giant furnace. China's government has concluded the best way to get rid of garbage is to burn it at incinerators like this one run by the Chaoyang District of Beijing. Chen Hui is the chief engineer at the plant.

CHEN HUI: (Through interpreter) Our emissions from burning the garbage are well below EU standards. And our technology is ahead of incinerators in the U.S.

SCHMITZ: This incinerator was opened nine months ago. The heat from burning garbage here produces enough electricity to power more than 140,000 homes.

CHEN: (Through interpreter) Our biggest goal is to protect the environment. This incinerator is funded, built and run by the government. We're not driven by profit.

SCHMITZ: This is not the case in the rest of China.

TAO GUANGYUAN: (Through interpreter) China has a few incinerators that burn garbage in a clean way, but they're not the ones winning bids for most government projects.

SCHMITZ: Tao Guangyuan is executive director of the Sino-German Renewable Energy Cooperation Center. He's worried about China's pledge to burn 40 percent of its garbage by 2020. That's because most incinerators in China are run by private companies.

TAO: (Through interpreter) Whoever burns garbage the cheapest wins government contracts. Some companies are willing to burn a ton of garbage for less than $4. When it's that cheap, you're definitely not burning it in a clean way.

SCHMITZ: Burning garbage in a clean way means doing so at more than 850 degrees Celsius with a high-tech filtration system that removes dioxins and other toxic gases. Tao says most waste-management companies in China can't afford to do that because local governments pay them so little. As a result, they're burning garbage the cheapest way possible, filling China's skies with heavy-metal and dioxin emissions that cause cancer.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Yelling in Chinese).

SCHMITZ: And that's why whenever China plans to build a new incinerator, this is increasingly the result.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Yelling in Chinese).

SCHMITZ: Thousands in the wealthy city of Hangzhou protested an incinerator planned for their neighborhood two years ago. Dozens were injured. The same scene has been replayed in cities across China. Song Guojun, professor of environmental economics and management at Renmin University, says there is a clear answer to China's garbage problem.

SONG GUOJUN: (Through interpreter) If we sorted garbage the way many other developed countries do, we'd cut the amount we need to burn in half. If we had a functioning recycling system, we could cut it by another 20 to 30 percent.

SCHMITZ: Song has spent his career studying garbage. He says in Taiwan, where residents sort their trash, incinerators are running out of trash to burn. That's because an average Taiwanese person generates half a pound of garbage a day. An average Chinese person - 2 and a half pounds. The thing is China has 1.3 billion more people than Taiwan. So think of the impact on the environment if China's government asked its people to sort their trash, asks Song.

SONG: (Through interpreter) Why hasn't China done this - because incinerator companies are a big special-interest group. I know this is doable. But they'd say it's unrealistic.

SCHMITZ: The stakes for the environment are huge, says Song. According to a World Bank report, in eight years, the Chinese will throw away 1.4 million tons of garbage a day, twice as much garbage as Americans generate. Half of it will be burned in incinerators where managers are currently more interested in profits than clean air. The question is a crucial one, says Song. If China can build the world's largest consumer class, why can't it get its people to sort their garbage? Rob Schmitz, NPR News, Beijing.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE SHANGHAI RESTORATION PROJECT SONG, "NANKING ROAD")

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