Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including President Bush; John Beckman, New Orleans planner; Harvey Bender of New Orleans Ninth Ward district; British Prime Minister Tony Blair; U.S. Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice; Sen. Arlen Specter (R-PA); Judge Samuel Alito; Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA); Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY).
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen.

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: From when I first came through here to today, New Orleans is reminding me of the city I used to come to visit. It's a heck of a place to bring your family. It's a great place to find some of the greatest food in the world, and some wonderful fun, and glad you got your infrastructure back on its feet. I know you're beginning to welcome citizens from all around the country here to New Orleans.

Mr. JOHN BECKMAN (New Orleans Planner): We need to begin the neighborhood planning process, to involve the residents in making these decisions and determining how they will come back.

Mr. HARVEY BENDER (New Orleans Resident): If we have to suit up like Army and protect my land, that's what I'm going to do. I don't need no police to protect me. If you try to come and take my land or whatever, that's what I'm gonna have to do. Just like that lady said, I'm going to die on mine.

Mayor RAY NAGIN (New Orleans): The realities are, we will have limited resources to redevelop our city.

Prime Minister TONY BLAIR (Great Britain): The decision by Iran is very serious indeed. I don't think that there's any point in people or us hiding our deep dismay at what Iran has decided to do, and when taken in conjunction with their other comments about the state of Israel, they cause real and serious alarm right across the world.

Secretary CONDOLEEZZA RICE (State Department): We agree that the Iranian regime's defiant resumption of uranium enrichment work leaves the EU with no choice but to request an emergency meeting of the IAEA Board of Governors.

Senator ARLEN SPECTER (Republican, Pennsylvania): Ladies and gentlemen, the Senate Judiciary Committee will now proceed to the confirmation hearings of Judge Samuel Alito Jr. for the Supreme Court of the United States.

Judge SAMUEL ALITO (Supreme Court Nominee): I am deeply honored to appear before you. I'm deeply honored to have been nominated for a position on the Supreme Court.

Senator EDWARD KENNEDY (Democrat, Massachusetts): We still do not have a clear answer to why Judge Alito joined this reprehensible group in the first place. We still do not know why he believed that membership in the group would enhance his job application in the Reagan Justice Department.

Senator CHARLES SCHUMER (Democrat, New York): Why won't you talk to us about Roe in terms of whether it's settled or not when you will about so many other issues, even issues that would come before the court?

Judge ALITO: I've tried to be as forthcoming as I can with the committee. I've tried to provide as many answers as I could, and obviously I'm speaking here extemporaneously in response to questions. The line that I have tried to draw is between issues that I don't think realistically will come before the court.

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