Squirrel Foils Attempted Theft Idaho isn't always a hot bed for news. But this week a pet squirrel scared off a would-be burglar trying to break into a gun safe.
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Squirrel Foils Attempted Theft

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Squirrel Foils Attempted Theft

Squirrel Foils Attempted Theft

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Imagine a home security system that costs acorns. Teenager broke into a home in Meridian, Idaho, this week. And when he tried to break into a gun safe in the house, he got scratched by Joey, a pet squirrel. Joey's holed up in the home of Adam Pearl of Meridian since he was found in a flower garden about six months ago. He hasn't been trained as a security squirrel but reportedly, trained himself to use a litter box. He eats nuts, greens and spinach. A lot of us could stand to be on the same diet as Joey.

Adam Pearl said he'd planned to release Joey into his backyard this spring. But after Joey foiled a burglar, he says, I'm kind of torn. He told KIVI in Boise, nobody can believe it because who can say they have a squirrel that guards their house?

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "SECRET SQUIRREL ")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: What an agent. What a squirrel. He's got the country in a whirl. What's his name? Secret Squirrel. He's got tricks up his sleeve most bad guys won't believe - a bullet proof coat, a cannon hat, machine gun cane with a rat tat tat tat.

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